Places Known For

building efforts


New Westminster

Westminster, who avidly supported Colonel Moody's city-building efforts and castigated the governor, who preferred to remain for the most part isolated in distant Victoria (Victoria, British Columbia). Ormsby, p. 177 In contrast to Victoria, where settlers from England had established a strong British presence, New Westminster's early citizens were largely Canadians and Maritimers, who brought a more business-oriented approach to commerce and dismissed the pretensions


Changchun

. '''Changchun Railway Station''' (长春站; ''Changchun Zhan'') is located at the north end of Renmin Avenue (人民大街). Although it is large and chaotic, providing you read Chinese and speak some Mandarin and are prepared to fight through the queues, you can buy a ticket to almost anywhere in China from here. Thanks to the railroad-building efforts of Japanese in the early- to mid-1900s, the rail network in Northeast China is extensive and no place is very far by rail. (All times approximate.) * '''Beijing


North Korea

deployed the 24th Infantry Division (24th Infantry Division (United States)) for duty in Japan to Pusan, South Korea. In addition to transporting troops and combat equipment to and from Korea, command ships supplied US bases and Distant Early Warning (Distant Early Warning Line) line construction sites and supported US nation building efforts from Europe and Africa, to the Far East. While working at City Lights Books in San Francisco, Scheer co-authored the book, ''Cuba


Afghanistan

not redirect resources from security to nation-building efforts, as this could enable factional forces to overthrow the internationally backed government in Kabul. Commons:Category:Afghanistan WikiPedia:Afghanistan Dmoz:Regional Asia Afghanistan


Japan

of the city government of Kobe, Japan that operates municipal subways (Rapid transit) and city buses. Previously, it also operated city trams. Reed and a kimono-clad Sue are married in a ceremony in Japan at the end of the film, moments before jetting off with Ben and Johnny to save Venice from sinking. Japan undertook major naval building efforts in the 16th century, during the Warring States period (Sengoku period), when feudal rulers vying for supremacy built vast coastal navies of several hundred ships. Around that time, Japan may have developed one of the first ironclad (Ironclad warship) warships, when Oda Nobunaga, a Japanese daimyo, had six iron-covered Oatakebune (Atakebune) made in 1576. ''THE FIRST IRONCLADS'' In Japanese: Also in English: ''"Iron clad ships, however, were not new to Japan and Hideyoshi; Oda Nobunaga, in fact, had many iron clad ships in his fleet."'' (referring to the anteriority of Japanese ironclads (1578) to the Korean Turtle ships (1592)). In Western sources, Japanese ironclads are described in CR Boxer "The Christian Century in Japan 1549–1650", p122, quoting the account of the Italian Jesuit Organtino visiting Japan in 1578. Nobunaga's ironclad fleet is also described in "A History of Japan, 1334–1615", Georges Samson, p309 ISBN 0-8047-0525-9. Korea's "ironclad Turtle ships" were invented by Admiral Yi Sun-sin, and are first documented in 1592. Incidentally, Korea's iron plates only covered the roof (to prevent intrusion), and not the sides of their ships. The first Western ironclads date to 1859 with the French ''Gloire'' (FS La Gloire (1858-1883)) ("Steam, Steel and Shellfire"). In 1588, Toyotomi Hideyoshi issued a ban on Wakō piracy; the pirates then became vassals of Hideyoshi, and comprised the naval force used in the Japanese invasion of Korea (Japanese invasions of Korea (1592-1598)). Japan undertook major naval building efforts in the 16th century, during the Warring States period (Sengoku period), when feudal rulers vying for supremacy built vast coastal navies of several hundred ships. Around that time, Japan may have developed one of the first ironclad (Ironclad warship) warships, when Oda Nobunaga, a Japanese daimyo, had six iron-covered Oatakebune (Atakebune) made in 1576. ''THE FIRST IRONCLADS'' In Japanese: Also in English: ''"Iron clad ships, however, were not new to Japan and Hideyoshi; Oda Nobunaga, in fact, had many iron clad ships in his fleet."'' (referring to the anteriority of Japanese ironclads (1578) to the Korean Turtle ships (1592)). In Western sources, Japanese ironclads are described in CR Boxer "The Christian Century in Japan 1549–1650", p122, quoting the account of the Italian Jesuit Organtino visiting Japan in 1578. Nobunaga's ironclad fleet is also described in "A History of Japan, 1334–1615", Georges Samson, p309 ISBN 0-8047-0525-9. Korea's "ironclad Turtle ships" were invented by Admiral Yi Sun-sin, and are first documented in 1592. Incidentally, Korea's iron plates only covered the roof (to prevent intrusion), and not the sides of their ships. The first Western ironclads date to 1859 with the French ''Gloire'' (FS La Gloire (1858-1883)) ("Steam, Steel and Shellfire"). In 1588, Toyotomi Hideyoshi issued a ban on Wakō piracy; the pirates then became vassals of Hideyoshi, and comprised the naval force used in the Japanese invasion of Korea (Japanese invasions of Korea (1592-1598)). Dudek played nine of the national team's ten 2002 FIFA World Cup qualifiers (2002 FIFA World Cup qualification (UEFA)) as it finished top of its group, and started in the finals in Japan and South Korea, in an eventual group stage exit. He also played in seven of his country's ten qualifying matches (2006 FIFA World Cup qualification (UEFA)) for the 2006 World Cup (2006 FIFA World Cup), but owing to a lack of appearances at club level during the season, he was dropped from the starting line-up in favour of Artur Boruc and left off the final squad as a result, at which point he had earned 56 caps. Around the middle 19th century Japanese ''Chindonya'' started to be seen using their skills for advertising, and these street performers are still occasionally seen in Japan. The complete series also aired in Argentina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Chile, Colombia, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Hungary, Pakistan, Iceland, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Portugal, Singapore, the Czech Republic and Slovakia. Prehistory Long before the arrival of the Spaniards (Spain) in the Philippines, large centers of population already thrived in Batangas. Native settlements lined the Pansipit River, a major waterway. The province had been trading with the Chinese (China) since Yuan Dynasty until first phase of Ming Dynasty in the 13th and 15th century. Inhabitants of the province were also trading with Japan and India. '''''Tsushima Maru''''' (対馬丸) was a Japanese passenger cargo ship that was sunk while carrying hundreds of schoolchildren by the submarine USS ''Bowfin'' (USS Bowfin (SS-287)) during World War II. The ship was on her way from Okinawa to Kagoshima. On August 22, 1944, at between 10:00 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. local time, ''Bowfin'' attacked the convoy in which the ''Tsushima Maru'' was sailing and sank her close by the island of Akusekijima. Sighted Bus, Sunk Same, USS Bowfin Submarine Museum & Park, Retrieved 30 May 2007 1,484 civilians, including 767 schoolchildren, were killed. 59 children survived the sinking. thumb right A Mississippian culture Mississippian-era (Image:Chromesun mississippian priest digital painting.jpg) priest, with a ceremonial flint mace and a severed head. By Herb Roe, based on a repousse copper plate. '''Headhunting''' is the practice of taking and preserving a person's head after killing them. Headhunting was practised in historic times in parts of China, India, Nigeria, Nuristan (Nuristan Province), Bangladesh, Myanmar, Borneo, Indonesia, the Philippines, Taiwan, Japan, Micronesia, Melanesia, New Zealand, Mesoamerica, Southwestern United States and the Amazon Basin, as well as among certain tribes of the Celts, the West Germanic peoples, the Norse ''The Growth of Literature''; Authors: H. Munro Chadwick, Nora K. Chadwick, Cambridge University Press, 2010, ISBN 1-108-01614-6, 9781108016148 p.93-94 and Scythians of ancient Europe. In fact, it occurred in Europe until the early 20th century in the Balkan Peninsula and to the end of the Middle Ages in Ireland and the Anglo-Scottish border regions. zh:日本 Commons:Category:Japan Wikipedia:Japan Dmoz:Regional Asia Japan


Ukraine

The '''Sknyliv air show disaster''' occurred on July 27, 2002, when a Ukrainian Air Force Sukhoi Su-27 of the Ukrainian Falcons crashed during an aerobatics presentation at Sknyliv airfield (Sknyliv) near Lviv, Ukraine. 77 people were killed and 543 injured, 100 of whom were hospitalised. It was the second major accident involving the Ukrainian military in less than a year, following the alleged downing of Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 in October 2001, and is the worst air show accident in history (List of airshow accidents). *A bomb believed planted by a Muslim separatist organisation killed 13 people, including a town mayor, and wounded 12 in a Christmas Eve attack in the southern Philippines town of Datu Piang. *Iran's state radio reported quoted a statement by airport officials, saying that pilot "carelessness" caused a plane carrying Ukrainian (Ukraine) and Russian aerospace scientists to crash in central Iran, killing all 46 people on board. *Sun Microsystems won a major antitrust victory against Microsoft when a federal judge ordered Microsoft to distribute Sun's Java programming language (Java (programming language)) in its Microsoft Windows operating system. *Thailand: Channel 3 (Channel 3 (Thailand)) *Ukraine: 1+1 *United Kingdom: Sky One (later rerun on FIVE (five (TV)), LivingTV, Ftn, CBS Drama) File:Rekonstruotas


Norway

in Norway, in the middle of the 19th century. His struggle to preserve the distribution of power - "the system Stang" - led to a bitter political struggle in the last years of his life came to a shadow of his big-building efforts for the country. In 1861, after a brief stint as mayor of Oslo (List of mayors of Oslo), Stang was appointed to the Norwegian cabinet. His time as a political leader was characterized by considerable discord within the Norwegian parliament (Stortinget) and between Norway and the Swedish (Sweden) government. His father was most of his life an underpaid judge, first in Ryfylke and later in Nordhordland. His father struggled to find money for the childrens education. As a 13-year-old Frederick was in the Latin school in Bergen. From there, he was discharged only 16 years old and therefore needed special permission to take the test at school graduation. He remarked himself as the best of all of the 62 candidates, and the following year he took another exam præceteris. Even during school hours in Bergen, he had to make a living by giving private lessons, and as a student in Christiania (Oslo), he continued as a teacher, since he was 18 years with the right to discharge their students to school graduation, and sometimes as a teacher at the Møller Institute (Møllerinstituttet). 22 years old, he accepted a position as lecturer of law at the University of Oslo. During this time, he published a seminal text on the Norwegian (Norway) constitutional (Norwegian Constitution) law (Norwegian law). He went over to private practice in 1834, where he distinguished himself as a trial attorney, especially in supreme court cases. In 1846, Stang became the most senior civil servant in the newly formed (and no longer existent) Domestic Ministry (Innenlandsdepartementet). He served in this position until 1856, and his tenure was characterized by tireless efforts to modernize Norway's economic infrastructure. In addition to improving the road network, harbors, canals, and lighthouses, he was in great measure responsible for Norway and Scandinavia's first railroad (Hovedbanen), from Oslo to Eidsvoll. He also worked hard to elevate the importance and function of agriculture in Norway, initiating the formation of a university-level school of agriculture, commissioned travelling agrarians, and encouraged better breeding among Norwegian farm animals. Stang published a long series of articles on important constitutional issues and Stang presented his fundamental political program. His starting point was that Norway had a "democratic-monarchy" form of government, where the Parliament (Parliament of Norway) was an expression of popular will but Stang wondered why the Constitution had been a subject to a restrictive and constraining power of the King (King of Norway) as the main leader of the nation. Stang saw the dangers of the development of a sclerotic, bureaucratic system and pointed out the need for interaction between the will of the people and the government's superior insight. The so-called "Almennvilje(n)" and should be the moving force. His view was a sort of democratic elitism, as historians such as Rune Slagstad aptly describes it. The Government (Government of Norway) should by their educational expertise and their prerogatives ensure that decisions are systematically made public, and not only was the result of chance or narrow self-interests. In 1846, Stang became the most senior civil servant in the newly formed (and no longer existent) Domestic Ministry (Innenlandsdepartementet). He served in this position until 1856, and his tenure was characterized by tireless efforts to modernize Norway's economic infrastructure. In addition to improving the road network, harbors, canals, and lighthouses, he was in great measure responsible for Norway and Scandinavia's first railroad (Hovedbanen), from Oslo to Eidsvoll. He also worked hard to elevate the importance and function of agriculture in Norway, initiating the formation of a university-level school of agriculture, commissioned travelling agrarians, and encouraged better breeding among Norwegian farm animals. Stang published a long series of articles on important constitutional issues and Stang presented his fundamental political program. His starting point was that Norway had a "democratic-monarchy" form of government, where the Parliament (Parliament of Norway) was an expression of popular will but Stang wondered why the Constitution had been a subject to a restrictive and constraining power of the King (King of Norway) as the main leader of the nation. Stang saw the dangers of the development of a sclerotic, bureaucratic system and pointed out the need for interaction between the will of the people and the government's superior insight. The so-called "Almennvilje(n)" and should be the moving force. His view was a sort of democratic elitism, as historians such as Rune Slagstad aptly describes it. The Government (Government of Norway) should by their educational expertise and their prerogatives ensure that decisions are systematically made public, and not only was the result of chance or narrow self-interests. In 1846, Stang became the most senior civil servant in the newly formed (and no longer existent) Domestic Ministry (Innenlandsdepartementet). He served in this position until 1856, and his tenure was characterized by tireless efforts to modernize Norway's economic infrastructure. In addition to improving the road network, harbors, canals, and lighthouses, he was in great measure responsible for Norway and Scandinavia's first railroad (Hovedbanen), from Oslo to Eidsvoll. He also worked hard to elevate the importance and function of agriculture in Norway, initiating the formation of a university-level school of agriculture, commissioned travelling agrarians, and encouraged better breeding among Norwegian farm animals. Stang published a long series of articles on important constitutional issues and Stang presented his fundamental political program. His starting point was that Norway had a "democratic-monarchy" form of government, where the Parliament (Parliament of Norway) was an expression of popular will but Stang wondered why the Constitution had been a subject to a restrictive and constraining power of the King (King of Norway) as the main leader of the nation. Stang saw the dangers of the development of a sclerotic, bureaucratic system and pointed out the need for interaction between the will of the people and the government's superior insight. The so-called "Almennvilje(n)" and should be the moving force. His view was a sort of democratic elitism, as historians such as Rune Slagstad aptly describes it. The Government (Government of Norway) should by their educational expertise and their prerogatives ensure that decisions are systematically made public, and not only was the result of chance or narrow self-interests. '''Hans Christian Petersen''' (1793-1862) was a Norwegian politician and served as the ''de facto'' Prime minister of Norway during the personal union of Sweden-Norway from 1858 to 1861. thumb Jørgen Herman Vogt. (File:J. H. Vogt.png) '''Jørgen Herman Vogt''' (Bragernes, 21 July 1784; Christiania (Oslo), 12 January 1862) was a Norwegian (Norway) politician who served as first minister of Norway from 1855 to 1858, during the personal union between Sweden and Norway (Sweden-Norway). The first minister was subordinated to the governor (governor of Norway) and the viceroy (viceroy of Norway) in the political hierarchy, but for two periods when no governor or viceroy was present, he served as a ''de facto'' prime minister of Norway. '''Bjørn Arild Lynne''' (born December 31, 1966) (also known as "Dr. Awesome" and "Divinorum") is a Norwegian sound engineer (Audio engineering) and music composer, now living and working in Stavern, Norway. He has been widely known as a tracker (tracker (music software)) music composer under the name "Dr. Awesome Crusaders" in the late 1980s–early 90s when he released numerous tunes in MOD (MOD (file format)) format and created music for some Amiga games. His work during that time period was mostly released into the demoscene world. In 1995 Bjørn moved to England and started working for the video game company Team17 as a sound designer and composer. He recorded most of his studio albums in England, including the Timura trilogy, inspired by the books of Allan Cole. Some of these albums have become quite popular, mostly among fans of indie music (Independent music). In June 2005 Bjørn moved back to Norway and now works as a freelance (Freelancer) composer and owns a plasma display shop. Norwegian races Sørlie has been racing dogs since the 1970s, and has won numerous races starting in 1991, including Femundløpet (ten times) and Europe's longest dog race, Finnmarksløpet (1995–1991, and 2001). He has won the Norwegian long-distance championship twice (1993 and 1995), and the mid-distance championship once (1992). In 2008 Sørlie won the inaugural Amundsen Race, a 400 km race from Østersund, Sweden, to Røros, Norway, edging out Bjørnar Andersen by just one minute. * Kraft Nabisco Championship at Mission Hills Country Club (Rancho Mirage, California) – Morgan Pressel, at 18 years 313 days, becomes the youngest woman to ever win a major. She is also the first American to win this particular event since Dottie Pepper in 1999. * LPGA Championship at Bulle Rock Golf Course (Havre de Grace, Maryland) – Norway's Suzann Pettersen wins her first major. * US Women's Open (United States Women's Open Championship (golf)) at Pine Needles Lodge & Golf Club (Southern Pines, North Carolina) – American Cristie Kerr wins her first major. From 1893 to 1898 Dagny and he lived at times in Berlin, and at times in Dagny's home-town of Kongsvinger, in Norway. In Berlin they met other artists at Zum schwarzen Ferkel. thumb right 300px Musher Thomas Knolmayer at the Willow, Alaska Willow (File:Iditarod 2005 - Knolmayer start in Willow.JPG) restart point. The ceremonial start of the '''33rd annual Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race''' across the US state of Alaska began in Anchorage (Anchorage, Alaska) on March 5, 2005 at 10 AM (12-hour clock) AKST (Alaska Standard Time Zone) (19:00 UTC (Coordinated Universal Time)), and restarted in Willow (Willow, Alaska) the next day at 2 PM (23:00 UTC). After covering Commons:Category:Norway Dmoz:Regional Europe Norway Wikipedia:Norway


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