Places Known For

black book


Tambov Oblast

New York (1986) ISBN 0-195-04054-6 Nicolas Werth, Karel Bartošek, Jean-Louis Panné, Jean-Louis Margolin, Andrzej Paczkowski, Stéphane Courtois, ''The Black Book of Communism: Crimes, Terror, Repression'', Harvard University Press, 1999, hardcover, 858 pages, ISBN 0-674-07608-7 The uprising took place in the territories of the modern Tambov Oblast and part of the Voronezh Oblast, less than 300 miles southeast

. The movement was later portrayed by the Soviets as a sort of anarchical banditry like other anti-Soviet movements who opposed them during this period. In October 1920 the peasant army numbered over 50,000 fighters, and was joined by numerous deserters from the Red Army. The rebel militia was highly effective and infiltrated even the Tambov Cheka. Alexander Schlichter, Chairman of the Tambov (Tambov Oblast) Gubernia Executive Committee, contacted


Voronezh Oblast

harvest.html''The Harvest of Sorrow: Soviet Collectivization and the Terror-Famine'' Oxford University Press New York (1986) ISBN 0-195-04054-6 Nicolas Werth, Karel Bartošek, Jean-Louis Panné, Jean-Louis Margolin, Andrzej Paczkowski, Stéphane Courtois, ''The Black Book of Communism: Crimes, Terror, Repression'', Harvard University Press, 1999, hardcover, 858 pages, ISBN 0-674-07608-7 The uprising took place in the territories


Stavropol

erected in 1931 also exists in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia. About 40 million people were affected by the food shortages including areas near Moscow where mortality rates increased by 50% . The center of the famine, however, was Ukraine and surrounding regions, including the Don (River Don, Russia), the Kuban, the Northern Caucasus and Kazakhstan where the toll was one million dead. The countryside

was affected more than cities, but 120,000 died in Kharkiv, 40,000 in Krasnodar and 20,000 in Stavropol. page 167, ''The Black Book of Communism'', ISBN 0-674-07608-7 #Oktyabrsky City District, Saratov, a city district of Saratov, Исполнительный комитет Саратовского областного Совета депутатов трудящихся. "Саратовская область. Административно-территориальное деление на 1 января 1970 года". Приволжское книжное


Bács-Bodrog County

shirt and brown toga with golden nimbus holding in dexter a downpointed silver sword with golden hilt and in sinister a black book (Bible). The Bačka-Bodrog county was divided between Yugoslavia and Hungary after World War I. The northern part of it was later incorporated into Bács-Kiskun county of Hungary, that also uses the coat of arms with St. Peter in its dexter half. thumb left Oil drilling facilities near Srbobran (File:Oil drilling facilities near Srbobran, Vojvodina, Serbia.jpg) According to archeology, there was human settlement in the territory of present-day Srbobran in the prehistoric times. The first written record about the settlement is from 1338, in which the Srbobran is mentioned under name ''Sentomas'', which means Saint Thomas (Thomas (Apostle)), i.e. the apostle Thomas, who was the patron saint of a monastery and of the village around it in the Middle Ages. During this time, the area was under administration of the medieval Kingdom of Hungary and was part of the Bacsensis County (Bács-Bodrog County). This village, together with the monastery, became destroyed during the Ottoman (Ottoman Empire) conquest in the 16th century. Its former population left the region and fled towards North to Habsburg Royal Hungary. During the Ottoman administration, the settlement of Sentomaš was rebuilt and was populated by ethnic Serbs. It was part of the Ottoman Sanjak of Segedin. After the Bačka region was captured by Habsburg (Habsburg Monarchy) troops led by Prince Eugene of Savoy in the end of the 17th century, a settlement was included into Habsburg Monarchy and was populated by new colonists, mainly by ethnic Serbs from the South, but also (since the second half of the 18th century) by ethnic Hungarians from the North, who became the second largest ethnic group in the settlement (after Serbs). The settlement was part of the Military Frontier until 1751, when it came under the civil administration. A document from 1751 indicates that besides name ''Sentomaš'', the name ''Srbograd'' (Serb Town) was also used as a non-official denomination for the town. The development of the town was fast; in 1787 its population was 3,532, while in 1836 this number rose to 11,321. From 1751, the town was part of the Theiss District (District of Potisje) within the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) and the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. Until the middle of the 19th century, the settlement was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the settlement was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). In the second half of the 19th century some Rusyns (Pannonian Rusyns) were settled here as well. After 1867, colonization of Hungarians was intensified, and until the beginning of the 20th century they replaced Serbs as largest ethnic group in Kula. According to the 1910 census the population of Kula was ethnically mixed: from the total population of 9,119 there was 3,679 speakers of Hungarian (Hungarian language), 2,510 speakers of Serbian (Serbian language), 2,425 speakers of German (German language), and 456 speakers of Rusyn (Pannonian Rusyn language). Until the middle of the 19th century, the settlement was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the settlement was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). In the second half of the 19th century some Rusyns (Pannonian Rusyns) were settled here as well. After 1867, colonization of Hungarians was intensified, and until the beginning of the 20th century they replaced Serbs as largest ethnic group in Kula. According to the 1910 census the population of Kula was ethnically mixed: from the total population of 9,119 there was 3,679 speakers of Hungarian (Hungarian language), 2,510 speakers of Serbian (Serbian language), 2,425 speakers of German (German language), and 456 speakers of Rusyn (Pannonian Rusyn language). History Tovariševo is one of the old Serb (Serbs) communities of Vojvodina, first mentioned in 1543, during Ottoman (Ottoman Empire) administration. It administratively was part of the Ottoman Sanjak of Segedin. In the end of the 17th century, the village was abandoned, but was repopulated in the beginning of the 18th century, during Habsburg (Habsburg Monarchy) administration. A description from the end of the 18th century (by András Vályi) states that ''"Tovarisova is a Rac (Raci (ethnonym))'' (Serb (Serbs)) ''village in Bács county (Bács-Bodrog County). The landowner is the Royal Hungarian Chamber and the population follows the old faith'' (i.e. Orthodox (Serbian Orthodoxy)). ''The black soil gives wheat, barley and oats, the village has an oak forest and a bad vineyard; it hasn't any water, but after the long autumn rains the soil became sodden; it lacks reed but it has silk-beetles. The nearest market-town is Újvidék ''(Novi Sad)'', where people can earn money from the sale of cattle."'' Until 1848, the village was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of autonomous Serbian Vojvodina, while from 1849 to 1860, it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, which was a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship, in 1860, the village was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). birth_date November 11, 1855 birth_place Zenta (Senta) (Serbian: Senta), Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County), Kingdom of Hungary, Austrian Empire death_date August 13, 1906 History The village was firstly mentioned in 1457. In this time it was under administration of the medieval Kingdom of Hungary and was part of the Bács (Bács-Bodrog County) (Bač) county. In the 16th-17th century, it was under administration of the Ottoman Empire and was part of the Sanjak of Segedin, firstly within the Budin Eyalet (Budin Province, Ottoman Empire) and later within the Egir Eyalet. During this time it was populated by ethnic Serbs. Until the middle of the 19th century, the village was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the village was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). According to 1910 census, most of the inhabitants of the village spoke Slovak language. Until the middle of the 19th century, the village was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the village was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). According to 1910 census, most of the inhabitants of the village spoke Slovak language. In the end of the 17th century, the region of Bačka was captured by the Habsburg Monarchy and in the second half of the 18th century Crvenka was mentioned as a small settlement. It was colonized by Serbs, Hungarians and Germans. Until the middle of the 19th century, the town was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the town was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). According to 1910 census, most of the inhabitants of the town spoke German language. In the end of the 17th century, the region of Bačka was captured by the Habsburg Monarchy and in the second half of the 18th century Crvenka was mentioned as a small settlement. It was colonized by Serbs, Hungarians and Germans. Until the middle of the 19th century, the town was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the town was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). According to 1910 census, most of the inhabitants of the town spoke German language.


Bryansk

, 8 November 2005 (UTC) *Salt Riot by me. Any pictures for this event? KNewman (User:KNewman) 03:31, 8 November 2005 (UTC) Bregman was born in the town of Zlynka in the Bryansk district. Bregman was a deputy minister of State Control and an active party member since 1912. He was editor-in-chief of ''The Book About Jews-Heroes of the War against Fascism''. He also participated in collecting materials for Black Book (Black Book (World War II)), a publication detailing


Krasnodar

million people were affected by the food shortages including areas near Moscow where mortality rates increased by 50% . The center of the famine, however, was Ukraine and surrounding regions, including the Don (River Don, Russia), the Kuban, the Northern Caucasus and Kazakhstan where the toll was one million dead. The countryside was affected more than cities, but 120,000 died in Kharkiv, 40,000 in Krasnodar

and 20,000 in Stavropol. page 167, ''The Black Book of Communism'', ISBN 0-674-07608-7 Russia Team relocation in football is rare if not nonexistent. However, one current top-level basketball team has moved twice in the 2000s. The club founded in 1946 as Lokomotiv Mineralnye Vody moved in 2003 to Rostov-on-Don, and then in 2008 to Krasnodar, where it is now known as Lokomotiv-Kuban (PBC Lokomotiv-Kuban). All three of the club's home cities


Ivanovo

, freedom of press, and free elections. All strikes were mercilessly suppressed by Cheka using arrests and executions. ''Black Book'', pages 86-87. birth_date birth_place Ivanovo, Imperial Russia death_date November 21 or December 3, 1882 Early life in Russia Nechayev was born in Ivanovo, then a small textile town, to poor parents — his father was a waiter and sign painter. His mother died when he was eight. His father remarried


Hungarian Soviet Republic

as "Lenin Boys". The Black Book of Communism pp. 272-5 The next attempt was the "March Action (Béla Kun#The "March Action" in Germany)" in Germany in 1921, including an attempt to dynamite the express train from Halle to Leipzig. After this failed, the Communist Party of Germany expelled its former Chairman, Paul Levi, from the party for publicly criticising the March Action in a pamphlet, Broue, P. (2006) ''The German

cancelled the plans, except due to miscommunication in Hamburg, where 200-300 Communists attacked police stations but were quickly defeated. The Black Book of Communism pp. 277-8 In 1924 there was a failed coup in Estonia (Estonian coup attempt of 1924) by the Estonian Communist Party. The Black Book of Communism pp. 278-9 At the 5th World Congress of the Comintern in July 1924, Zinoviev condemned Marxist philosopher Georg Lukács


Zhytomyr

; According to ''The Black Book of Communism'', in the pacification of Ukraine that began during the Soviet counteroffensive in 1920 and which would not end until 1922 the Soviets would take tens of thousands of Ukrainian lives. Courtois, Stephane; Werth, Nicolas; Panne, Jean-Louis; Paczkowki, Andrzej; Bartosek, Karel; Margolin, Jean-Louis (1999). The Black Book of Communism. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. ISBN 0-674-07608-7 ref>


National Transitional Council

capital of the Libyan Republic, as the NTC had previously declared its capital to be Tripoli, controlled by Muammar Gaddafi's Great Socialist People's Libyan Arab Jamahiriya. In the meantime, the structure of covert cells that Ibrahim had helped set up in 1994 had spread to Khartoum. The dissidents, dubbing themselves the "The Seekers of Truth and Justice" published the ''Black Book (The Black Book: Imbalance of Power and Wealth in the Sudan)'' in 2000, claiming that riverine Arabs dominated political power and resources. Khalil Ibrahim sided with the breakaway Popular Congress party, who had split from President al-Bashir's party.


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