Places Known For

beauty national


South Hams

-on-Sea Bigbury Bay past Burgh Island and Hope Cove to the promontory known as Bolt Tail. The next 6 miles (10 km) of cliff top paths from Bolberry Down past Bolt Head and the tidal ria of Kingsbridge Estuary to Prawle Point, belong to the National Trust (National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty). The estuary is crossed using the Salcombe Ferry, from Salcombe to East Portlemouth, close to Salcombe Castle and within the South Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). The path passes through the Prawle Point and Start Point Site of Special Scientific Interest which is recognised as being an important site for solitary bees and wasps, the rare cuckoo bee ''Nomada sexfasciata'', and the Cirl bunting. '''Ashprington''' is a village and civil parish in the South Hams district of Devon, England. According to the 2001 census the parish had a population of 428. The village is not far from the River Dart, and is about three miles south of Totnes. thumb Berry Court - Berry Pomeroy. (Image:Berry Court - Berry Pomeroy - geograph.org.uk - 35779.jpg) '''Berry Pomeroy''' is a village and civil parish in the South Hams district of Devon, England, about two miles east of Totnes. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 973. Berry Pomeroy is part of the Totnes constituency, although it is in fact larger than the neighbouring town (in terms of the geographic size of the parish, not comparative population). thumb 300px right The Royal Oak Inn (File:The Royal Oak Inn, Bigbury.jpg) '''Bigbury''' is a village and civil parish in the South Hams district of Devon, England. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 582. thumb Normandy Arms - Blackawton. (Image:Normandy Arms - Blackawton - geograph.org.uk - 24238.jpg) '''Blackawton''' is a village and civil parish in the South Hams district of Devon, England. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 647. The village is about six miles west of Dartmouth (Dartmouth, Devon). '''Kingswear''' is a village and civil parish in the South Hams area of the English (England) county of Devon. The village is located on the east bank of the tidal River Dart, close to the river's mouth and opposite the small town of Dartmouth (Dartmouth, Devon). It lies within the South Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, and has a population of 1,332. Office for National Statistics : ''Census 2001 : Parish Headcounts : South Hams'' Retrieved 27 January 2010 thumb Buckland-Tout-Saints Hotel. (Image:Buckland-Tout-Saints Hotel - geograph.org.uk - 910605.jpg) '''Buckland-Tout-Saints''' is a village and civil parish in the South Hams district of Devon, England. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 178. The '''''Totnes Times''''' is a local newspaper serving the town of Totnes and the surrounding South Hams area in Devon. It is owned by Tindle Newspapers. Published weekly, it appears on Wednesdays.It is known for its general right-wing leaning views.


High Peak, Derbyshire

settlements are Glossop, Buxton, New Mills, Chapel-en-le-Frith and Whaley Bridge, which contain most of the services for the borough such as retail, public sector, leisure and entertainment as well as most of the major transport links such as railways and buses. National Trust The National Trust (National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty) is a major landowner in the district, owning extensive tracts of moorland and a number of farms, including some in Edale. Features


Redditch

Court , a National Trust (National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty) property, where it crosses a minor road as a ford (ford (river)). The '''River Arrow''' rises on Beacon Hill in the Lickey Hills Country Park in the Lickey Hills in the north of Worcestershire, England, and heads generally south eastwards to become a major tributary of the River Avon (River Avon, Warwickshire). The river flows through Cofton Hackett, Bittell (where it feeds

Lower Bittell Reservoir (Bittell Reservoirs)) and Alvechurch before becoming the core of the Arrow Valley Country Park in Redditch. At the eastern boundary of Redditch the river enters Warwickshire and flows through the river meadows at Studley, and then on through Spernall to the back of Coughton Court, a National Trust (National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty) property, where it crosses a minor road as a ford (river) ford


Metropolitan Borough of Gateshead

First Flight accessdate 2008-01-23 work BBC News date 27 July 2006 The borough also contains one National Trust (National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty) site, the expansive Gibside estate near Rowlands Gill, containing a stately home and a chapel, parts of its grounds have also been give SSSI status.


North Somerset

: www.pastscape.org.uk hob.aspx?hob_id 195114 work National Monuments Record publisher English Heritage accessdate 22 March 2011 '''Clevedon Court''' is a manor house on Court Hill in Clevedon, North Somerset, England, dating from the early fourteenth century. It is now owned by the National Trust (National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty). It has been designated by English Heritage as a Grade I listed building. south east of Bristol Temple Meads on the Bristol to Taunton Line.


Deheubarth

. The foundations of two Roman forts have been discovered in the grounds of the Dinefwr estate, which is in the custody of the National Trust (National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty). The estate of Golden Grove (Golden Grove, Carmarthenshire) lies near the town, and further away, the impressive Carreg Cennen castle, another Welsh stronghold. The remains of Talley Abbey can be seen six miles away to the north of the town. Ten miles further north are the remains of the Roman gold mines of Dolaucothi, another National Trust property. *'''County of Champagne''' - Theobald IV (Theobald IV of Champagne) (1201–1253) *'''Deheubarth''' - Maelgwyn ap Rhys, Prince of Deheubarth (List of rulers of Wales) (1199–1230), disputed with Rhys the Hoarse (1216–1234) *'''Kingdom of Denmark''' - Valdemar II (Valdemar II of Denmark), the Victorious (1202–1241) *'''County of Champagne''' - Theobald IV (Theobald IV of Champagne) (1201–1253) *'''Deheubarth''' - Maelgwyn ap Rhys, Prince of Deheubarth (List of rulers of Wales) (1199–1230), disputed with Rhys the Hoarse (1216–1234) *'''Kingdom of Denmark''' - Valdemar II (Valdemar II of Denmark), the Victorious (1202–1241) Family Rhys ap Tewdwr claimed the throne of Deheubarth following the death of his second cousin Rhys ab Owain in battle against Caradog ap Gruffydd in 1078. Early rule In 1081 Caradog ap Gruffydd invaded Deheubarth and drove Rhys to seek sanctuary in the St David's Cathedral. Norman homage The same year William the Conqueror visited Deheubarth, ostensibly on a pilgrimage to St David's, but with a major show of power as well, traversing the width of southern Wales, and it seems likely he came to an arrangement with Rhys, whereby Rhys paid him homage and was confirmed in possession of Deheubarth. Rhys paid William £40 a year for his kingdom, ensuring good future relations with William that lasted until the end of his lifetime. Rhys was content with the arrangement as it meant that he only had to deal with the jealousy of his fellow Welsh princes. '''Dinefwr Castle''' (sometimes anglicized as '''Dynevor''') is a Welsh castle overlooking the River Tywi near the town of Llandeilo, Carmarthenshire, Wales. It lies on a ridge on the northern bank of the Tywi, with a steep drop of several hundred feet to the river. Dinefwr was the chief seat of the Principality of Deheubarth. The castle is owned by the Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales (who do not charge for entry) and is managed by Cadw but lies within Dinefwr Park, which is owned by the National Trust (National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty). Visitors who wish to see the castle and are driving there, may pay admission for the car park, if not National Trust members. A separate fee is payable if you wish to visit Newton House (Newton House (Llandeilo, Carmarthenshire)). Alternatively, access is free to walkers from Llandeilo town nearby, and there is a small free car park near the castle, but it can only be reached by a rough track through the deer park. By 1167 MacMurrough had obtained the services of Maurice Fitz Gerald (Maurice FitzGerald, Lord of Lanstephan) and later persuaded Rhys ap Gruffydd Prince of Deheubarth to release Fitz Gerald's half-brother Robert Fitz-Stephen from captivity to take part in the expedition. Most importantly he obtained the support of the Earl of Pembroke Richard de Clare (Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke), known as Strongbow. The original castle was established by 1116 as the castle of Robert Courtemain, who is recorded to have entrusted its care to the Welshman Bleddyn ap Cedifor. The castle also was the meeting place of Henry II of England with Rhys ap Gruffudd (Rhys ap Gruffydd) in 1171-1172, were they agreed a treaty of peace. When Henry II of England died in 1189 the castle along with St Clears and llansteffan were seized by Rhys ap Gruffudd (Rhys ap Gruffydd) of Deheubarth in 1189, Laugharne Castle may have been burnt down at this time.


Rishon LeZion

for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty National Trust collection at Waddesdon Manor. However, in 1882 Edmond cut back on his purchases of art and began to buy land in Palestine. He became a leading proponent of the Zionist (Zionism) movement, financing the first site at Rishon LeZion. In his goal for the establishment of a Jewish homeland, he promoted industrialization and economic development. In 1924, he established the Palestine Jewish Colonization Association


Sedgemoor

English ''buruh'' (fortified hill) and ''brycg'' (bridge). In the village is Burrow Mump, an ancient earthwork now owned by the National Trust (National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty). Burrow Mump is also known as St Michael's Borough or Tutteyate.


Worthing

'''Cissbury''' is the name of a prehistoric site near the village of Findon (Findon, West Sussex) around 5 miles north of Worthing in the English (England) county of West Sussex. The site is managed by the National Trust (National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty). In April 1884 the owner of a drinks store in Worthing objected to Salvation Army criticism concerning the selling of alcoholic beverages so he founded the 4,000 member organisation. JSTOR ''Folklore'' Vol. 99, No. 2 (1988) pgs 221-231 The "Skeletons" recognised each other by various insignia used to distinguish themselves. Salvation Army Collectables website Although the script of the series makes great play of its Bournemouth setting, the location filming for the first three series was largely carried out in and around Brighton and Worthing. The first genuine appearance of Bournemouth town centre and the nearby suburb of Boscombe is in the 1992 Christmas special. Maclean's education began as a boarder at St Ronan's School, Worthing. At the age of 13, he was sent to Gresham's School in Norfolk, ''I Will Plant Me a Tree: an Illustrated History of Gresham's School'' by S.G.G. Benson and Martin Crossley Evans (James & James, London, 2002) where he remained from 1926 until 1931, when he was 18. At Gresham's, some of his contemporaries were Lord Simon of Glaisdale (Jocelyn Simon, Baron Simon of Glaisdale), James Klugmann (1912–1977), Roger Simon (Roger Simon, 2nd Baron Simon of Wythenshawe) (1913–2002), Benjamin Britten (1913-1976) and the scientist Sir Alan Lloyd Hodgkin (Alan Lloyd Hodgkin). '''Goring-by-Sea''' is a neighbourhood of the Borough of Worthing in West Sussex, England, about wikipedia:Worthing


Northern England

in the region and became a major landowner, granting much of her property to the National Trust (National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty) on her death. In turn, the large amount of land owned by the National Trust assisted in the formation of the Lake District National Park (National parks of England and Wales) in 1951, which remains the largest National Park in England and has come to dominate the identity and economy of the county. '''Yorkshire (w:Yorkshire)''', a historic county (w:Historic counties of England) of northern (w:Northern England) England (w:England). It is the largest historic county in Great Britain (w:Great Britain) and has a population of over 5 million people.


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