Places Known For

architectural projects


Khulna

in the territory of modern-day Bengal, reaching to Khulna in the south and Sylhet in the east. The sultans advanced civic institutions and became more responsive and "native" in their outlook and cut loose from Delhi. Considerable architectural projects were completed including the massive Adina Mosque and the Darasbari Mosque which still stands in Bangladesh near the border. The Sultans of Bengal were patrons of Bengali literature and began a process in which Bengali culture

Shahi dynasty Shamsuddin Iliyas Shah founded the dynasty. It lasted from 1342-1487. The dynasty successfully repulsed attempts by Delhi to conquer them. They continued to reel in the territory of modern-day Bengal, reaching to Khulna in the south and Sylhet in the east. The sultans advanced civic institutions and became more responsive and "native" in their outlook and cut loose from Delhi. Considerable architectural projects were completed including the massive Adina


Khiva

the emir who was untiringly taking care of law and order and reported that the city was so full of people that it was almost impossible to find one's way in the crowd. It wasn't until the 16th century when Khiva was made capital of an Islamic Khanate (starting a bitter rivalry with another Khan 460 km down the Silk Road in Bukhara), that the majority of Khiva's immense architectural projects began and the town established itself as a center of power in the region. Locals will say (sometimes in hushed tones) that if Khiva didn't have a rivalry with nearby Bukhara, it would not be the significant site that it is today. In the 19th century only a strong central power was created and taxes and money were introduced. For a long period of time Khiva was one of the most important markets of slaves in Central Asia. Slavery. however, was formally abolished during the October Revolution of 1917 only. Khiva with its 94 mosques and 63 mederssahs is considered as an important center of Islam. Because of this significance, Khiva was recognized as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1990. Climate Khiva almost has a two-season climate; with slivers of spring and fall in between frigid winters and blazing hot summers. It starts to get uncomfortably cold in Khiva by November, with temperatures hovering between -10°C and 5°C. The chill usually lasts well into mid-March; just in time for the '''Navruz''' holiday. Spring usually lasts around a month and a half and is usually one of the best times to visit. Summer arrives quickly, however, with temperatures reaching as high as 45°C by August. Luckily, it's a dry heat (rainfall and humidity are practically negligible) so walking around the city isn't too much of a burden. Get in Usually people travel to the regional capital of Urgench, whether it's by air, train, or taxi, and then take a taxi to Khiva. With the exception of flying where the rates are fixed (most of the time) you might be subject to ticket agents at the train or bus stations charging you a bit higher for a fare because you look like a tourist. Ask a guide or local for correct information, as Uzbeks are usually willing to assist you in getting the correct price. You will, however, be expected to haggle for the price of your cab everywhere, with the unusual exception of the taxi from the Urgench bazaar to Khiva (see "by car"). * WikiPedia:Khiva Commons:Category:Khiva Dmoz:Regional Asia Uzbekistan Localities Khiva


Württemberg

. Instead he continued to be given design commissions and was involved in almost all the foremost architectural projects undertaken in Stuttgart to the 1830s (e.g., Katharinenhospital, 1827; Hoftheater, 1833). Among the few Works by Thouret that have been preserved are his schemes for the interior decoration of Weimar Palace (begun 1789) and Ludwigsburg Palace (begun 1805), the theatre (1812) at Ludwigsburg Palace, the assembly hall and pump room (begun 1825) in Bad Cannstatt and the Eberhard baths (begun 1838) in Wildbad. Life and work From 1778 to 1788 he was educated at the Hohe Karlsschule in Stuttgart where he trained as a painter. He then attended the Académie des Beaux-Arts (1789–1790) in Paris and studied architecture in Rome (1791–1797). After returning to Stuttgart, he worked for the court in Württemberg as a designer-draughtsman and decorative painter. An early architectural project was the Gothic Revival church of Hohenheim (1797; re-erected 1803 at Monrepos, Ludwigsburg; ruin since 1940s. With the assistance of Goethe (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe), whom he met in Stuttgart in 1797, Thouret was commissioned to design the décor of the Schloss in Weimar and to renovate the court theatre there (1798–1800). On his return to Stuttgart, Thouret was appointed court architect to Frederick II, Duke of Württemberg (1754–1816), in 1799. He undertook numerous building projects, nearly all in the Neo-classical style (Neoclassicism), in Stuttgart and Ludwigsburg where the dukes had their official residences; these schemes took account of the increasing need for prestigious buildings in Württemberg, following its elevation in 1806 to the Status of a kingdom, with the Duke becoming its first king. As well as renovations to the royal palaces, designs for park furniture and ephemeral festival constructions, several theatre projects were entrusted to Thouret, and he also produced furniture designs for the interior decoration of the palaces. In addition to his work for the Court, Thouret designed many private buildings, especially in Stuttgart (e.g., Wohnhaus Erbe, Königstrasse, 1806; Wohnhaus Kohl, Friedrichstrasse, 1817). After the death of the King in 1816, Thouret was dismissed in 1817 from his post as court architect. He was appointed Professor of architecture, but because of delays in the proposed establishment of a professional academy his potential as a teacher of architecture was never developed. Instead he continued to be given design commissions and was involved in almost all the foremost architectural projects undertaken in Stuttgart to the 1830s (e.g., Katharinenhospital, 1827; Hoftheater, 1833). Among the few Works by Thouret that have been preserved are his schemes for the interior decoration of Weimar Palace (begun 1789) and Ludwigsburg Palace (begun 1805), the theatre (1812) at Ludwigsburg Palace, the assembly hall and pump room (begun 1825) in Bad Cannstatt and the Eberhard baths (begun 1838) in Wildbad. This remained for two years her headquarters. Fontaines, half-charlatan, half-dupe, had introduced into his household a prophetess named Marie Gottliebin Kummer '''Olaf Saile''' (August 27, 1901 - June 29, 1952) was a German (Germany) writer born in Weitingen (Eutingen im Gäu), Württemberg. Saile's principal claim to fame is the historical novel ''Kepler, Roman einer Zeitwende'' first published in German (German language) in Stuttgart in 1938 and many times reprinted. It is an imagined biography of the life and times of the astronomer and mathematician Johannes Kepler. The novel was translated into English (English language) by James A Galston and published in New York in 1940 by Oskar Piest, under the title ''Troubadour of the Stars''. The novel has occasionally been interpreted as a coded protest against the Nazi régime which Saile had experienced at first hand. Following the banning of the Social Democratic Party (Social Democratic Party (Germany)) by the Nazis, in June 1933 as editor of the newspaper ''Rathenower Zeitung'', during the subsequent wave of arrests Olaf Saile was briefly detained in the Oranienburg Concentration Camp, during which time he was maltreated. His release was apparently secured after a friend and fellow-journalist Käthe Lambert used her journalistic credentials to enter the camp and then to write a report detailing conditions there. They subsequently married. Saile died at the age of 50 and was buried in the Church of St. Bernhardt in Esslingen am Neckar. Käthe Saile is buried alongside her husband. Falkenhayn (Erich von Falkenhayn)'s forces made several probing attacks into the mountain passes held by the Romanian Army to see if there were weaknesses in the Romanian defences. After several weeks, he concentrated his best troops (the elite ''Alpen Korps'') in the south for an attack on the Vulcan Pass. The attack (Battle of Vulcan Pass) was launched on November 10. One of the young officers was the future Field Marshal Erwin Rommel. On November 11, then-Lieutenant Rommel led the Württemberg Mountain Company in the capture of Mount Lescului. The offensive pushed the Romanian defenders back through the mountains and into the plains by November 26. There was already snow covering the mountains and soon operations would have to halt for the winter. Advances by other parts of Falkenhayn's Ninth Army (9th Army (German Empire)) also pushed through the mountains; the Romanian Army was being ground down by the constant battle and their supply situation was becoming critical. * Michałów (Michałów, Pińczów County) (1953) of Poland, which breeds Arabians. *Marbach stud, (1477) also known as Weil-Marbach, Württemberg (present day Germany). Produces Arabians, Black Forest Horses, Haflingers (Haflinger (horse)), and warmbloods. *Yeguada Militar, Spain


Tirana

of the above architectural projects, clashes between occupying forces and local resistance and the coming to power of the communists. In 1930, the northern portion of modern ''Dëshmorët e Kombit'' (National Martyrs) Boulevard) was finished and named Zog I Boulevard. Meanwhile, the ministerial complex, boulevard axis, Royal Palace (Palace of the Brigades), former municipal building, and the National Bank (Bank of Albania) were still under construction. The latter is the work


Acre, Israel

Bahá'í holy places thumb Bahai shrine in Acre, Bahji mansion (File:Bahji.jpg) There are many Bahá'í (Bahá'í Faith) holy places in and around Acre. They originate from Bahá'u'lláh's imprisonment in the Citadel (Bahá'í World Centre buildings#Prison cell of Bahá'u'lláh) during Ottoman Rule. The final years of Bahá'u'lláh's life were spent in the Mansion of Bahjí, just outside Acre, even though he was still formally a prisoner of the Ottoman Empire. Bahá'u'lláh died on 29 May 1892 in Bahjí, and his shrine (Shrine of Bahá'u'lláh) is the most holy place (Most Holy Place) for Bahá'ís — their Qiblih, the location they face when saying their daily prayers. It contains the remains of Bahá'u'lláh and is near the spot where he died in the Mansion of Bahjí. Other Bahá'í sites in Acre are the House of `Abbúd (where Bahá'u'lláh and his family resided) and the House of `Abdu'lláh Páshá (where later 'Abdu'l-Bahá resided with his family), and the Garden of Ridván (Garden of Ridván, Akká) where he spent the end of his life. In 2008, the Bahai holy places (Bahá'í World Centre buildings) in Acre and Haifa were added to the UNESCO World Heritage List (World Heritage Site).


Calgary

-conscious_communting2.asp As an alternative to the over . The Peace Bridge provides pedestrians and cyclists, access to the downtown core from the north side of the Bow river. The bridge ranked among the top 10 architectural projects in 2012 and among the top 10 public spaces of 2012. http


Cincinnati

of the 50 largest in the United States. Cincinnati is known for its historic architecture. In the late 1800s, Cincinnati was commonly referred to as "Paris of America," mainly due to significant architectural projects, like


Tokyo

Budapest 2008 Oberhausen 2009 Vienna 2010 Stuttgart 2010 Antwerpen 2011 Seinäjoki 2011 St. Petersburg 2011 Berlin 2011 Nitra thumb "Appropriate Proportion", one of his architectural projects. Renovation of Gooh shrine, Naoshima (Image:Art House Project05s3200.jpg), Kagawa prefecture, Japan '''Hiroshi Sugimoto''' (杉本博司, Sugimoto Hiroshi), born on February 23, 1948, is a Japanese (Japanese people) photographer currently dividing his time between Tokyo, Japan and New York City, USA. His catalog is made up of a number of series, each having a distinct theme and similar attributes. thumb right 150px Hagoita-kazari(羽子板飾り) (Image:Battledore decoration,hagoita,katori-city,japan.JPG) '''Hagoita''' (羽子板 「はごいた」) are rectangular wooden paddles, originating in Japan, ostensibly used to play hanetsuki, but often instead serving a more ornamental purpose. These are frequently painted, usually with lacquer, with auspicious symbols, or decorated with complex silk collages. This tradition dates to the 17th century, and although the game itself is now rarely played, crafting decorative hagoita is still commonplace. They are generally sold at traditional fairs, '''hagoita ichi''', which are held in December. In Tokyo, they are sold at shrines, especially Asakusa (Asakusa Jinja) and Furukawa Fudō. Station history Numazu Station was opened on February 1, 1889 when the section of the Tōkaidō Main Line connecting Shizuoka (Shizuoka Station) with Kōzu (Kōzu Station (Kanagawa)) was completed. A spur line to nearby Numazu Port was established in 1899. The first station building burned down in a fire of 1913 and the second in a fire of 1926. On December 1, 1934, Numazu was connected directly with Atami Station via the Tanna Tunnel, thus eliminating the previous long detour north to Gotemba Station in the section between Tokyo and Shizuoka. Numazu Station was rebuilt in 1937, but was burned down again, this time in the Bombing of Numazu in World War II. The next station building was erected in 1953, and rebuilt in 1973. All freight operations were relocated from Numazu Station in 1986 to a specially-built freight station operated by Japan Freight Railway Company one kilometer to the west. Regular high speed freight services and container freight operations continue from this facility. foundation May 1998 in Mountain View, CA location New York, NY, with other offices in Mountain View, CA, Chicago, IL (Chicago), Miami, FL, Los Angeles, CA, San Francisco, CA, Dallas, TX (Dallas), Las Vegas, NV (Las Vegas metropolitan area) and Toronto, Ontario in North America; London, England, Manchester, England, Barcelona, Spain, Paris, France, Munich, Germany and Hamburg, Germany in Europe; Hong Kong, Beijing, Shanghai, Taipei, Seoul, Singapore, Tokyo and Sydney, Australia in Asia Pacific. key_people Ralph Bartel, Ph.D., founder Holger Bartel, Chairman of the Board Christopher Loughlin, CEO Shirley Tafoya, President, North American Glen Ceremony, CFO Honnus Cheung, CFO, Asia Pacific Jason Yap, CEO, Asia Pacific - Japan Tokyo '''Nippon''' or '''Nihon''' 日本 '''Tōkyō''' 東京 Japanese (Japanese language) (Kanji Hiragana Katakana) - It was recorded in Tokyo, Japan and Denver, Colorado between July 1989 and March 1990 for NER Tesco. - UNICON 3 1987 Tokyo, Japan - - UNICON 12 2004 July 23 - August 1 Tokyo, Japan - founder Pioneer Corporation location Akasaka (Akasaka, Tokyo), Tokyo, Japan) key_people company_slogan foundation Tokyo, Japan (1937) location Chiba (Chiba, Chiba), Chiba (Chiba Prefecture), Japan In 1937 WikiPedia:Tokyo Dmoz:Regional Asia Japan Prefectures Tokyo Commons:Category:Tokyo


Toronto

Montreal, Quebec and the Atlantic Ocean, but the construction of the Saint Lawrence Seaway ended the forwarding trade. Prescott is on the mainline of the Canadian National Railway connecting Toronto to Montreal, and is near the junction of the east-west Highway 401 (Ontario Highway 401) and Highway 416 (Ontario Highway 416) north to Ottawa. In the 1990s, Stella began making free-standing sculpture for public spaces and developing architectural projects. In 1993


Greece

buildings were depicted. Those served as models for his own architectural projects. Klenze studied ancient architecture during his travels to Italy and Greece. He also participated in excavations of ancient buildings in Athens and submitted projects for the restoration of the Acropolis. During the recording of "For Your Life" at Musicland Studios, Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant was convalescing from a car accident which he had sustained in Greece


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