Places Known For

agricultural development


Calamba, Laguna

Buffer Zone 333 - Makiling Forest Reservation Zone 579.78 - Agricultural Development Zone 1,427 - Shoreland Area - - '''Total Land Area''' '''14,480''' - Urban Expansion Area 8,562.7 has Barangays Calamba City is politically subdivided into 54 barangays, the smallest administrative unit in the city.

7,116 5,309 Urban Agricultural Development Zone - 3 Banlic 274.9 12,780 12,626 Urban Agricultural Development Zone - 4 Barandal 189.3 4,625 2,994 Rural Growth Management Zone 1 - 5 Barangay 1 (Poblacion) 29.2 6,569 6,415 Urban Urban Redevelopment Zone - 6 Barangay 2 (Poblacion) 17.1 8,005 6,764 Urban Urban Redevelopment Zone - 7 Barangay 3 (Poblacion) 29.8 4,408 5,111 Urban

Urban Redevelopment Zone - 13 Bubuyan 196.0 1,666 1,466 Rural Upland Conservation Zone - 14 Bucal (Bucal, Calamba) 265.0 11,346 12,171 Urban Upland Conservation Zone Urban Redevelopment Zone Agricultural Development Zone - 15 Bunggo 556.6 3,809 3,650 Rural Upland Conservation Zone - 16 Burol 258.2 1,783 1,722 Rural Upland Conservation Zone - 17 Camaligan 106.5 978


Economic Community of West African States

and Red Crescent Movement ICRM , IDA (International Development Association), IFAD (International Fund for Agricultural Development), IFC (International Finance Corporation), IFRCS (International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement), ILO (International Labour Organization), IMF (International Monetary Fund), International Maritime Organization, Intelsat, Interpol (Interpol (organization)), IOC, IOM (International Organization for Migration) (observer

and Development IBRD , ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization), ICCt (International Criminal Court) (signatory), ICRM (International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement), IDA (International Development Association), IDB (Islamic Development Bank), IFAD (International Fund for Agricultural Development), IFC (International Finance Corporation), IFRCS (International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement), ILO (International Labour Organization), International Monetary Fund

Organization ICAO , ICRM (International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement), IDA (International Development Association), IDB (Islamic Development Bank), IFAD (International Fund for Agricultural Development), IFC (International Finance Corporation), IFRCS (International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement), IHO (International Hydrographic Organization) (pending member), ILO (International Labour Organization), IMF (International Monetary Fund), International Maritime


Latin Union

• IBRD (World Bank) • IBSA (IBSA Dialogue Forum) •ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization) • ICC (International Criminal Court) • ICRM (International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement) • IDA (International Development Association) • IFAD (International Fund for Agricultural Development) • IFC (International Finance Corporation) • IFRCS (International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement) • IHO (International Hydrographic Organization) • International Labour Organization

Criminal Police Organization , International Development Association, International Finance Corporation, International Fund for Agricultural Development, International Labour Organization, International Maritime Organization, International Maritime Satellite Organization, International Monetary Fund (IMF), International Olympic Committee, International Organization for Migration, International Organization for Standardization, International

Movement ICRM , IFAD (International Fund for Agricultural Development), IFC (International Finance Corporation), IFRCS (International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement), ILO (International Labour Organization), IMF (International Monetary Fund), IMO (International Maritime Organization), Inmarsat (International Mobile Satellite Organization), Intelsat, Interpol (Interpol (organization)), IOC, IOM (International Organization for Migration), International Organization


Lishui

, the local government of Lishui has transformed its work priority to economic development. The government put forward a policy where forestry is the top priority, combining food and livestock husbandry, multi-management, comprehensive development and enhanced the agricultural development. In 1985, the local government proposed the guideline of: * Emancipate the mind * Take a bold reforming attitude * Make Lishui more efficient * Achieve Double Development Ahead of Schedule * Promote the Development

, and Qingtian carved stones, enjoy high popularity both at home and abroad. A comprehensive agricultural development program is beginning to take effect. The prefecture is now a commercial base for edible fungi, dried and fresh fruit, bamboo and bamboo shoots, tea, commercial forest, oil tea, sericulture, herb medicine, vegetable and nuts. Products like Xianggu mushrooms, tree fungus, Huiming tea, white pond lily, day lily, sun-cured tobacco, and orange and oil tea are produced in large quantities and are well known throughout Zhejiang. Energy production Lishui is abundant in energy resources. With 600 hydroelectric power stations in use and 500 more still under construction, the prefecture has a total power capacity of 547 megawatts and an annual output of 1.5 billion kilowatt-hours (5.4 PJ). Every city of the prefecture has been incorporated in the east China power network, which provides a 220,000-volt vertical and a 110,000-volt inter-regional power transmission system, with a stable substation capacity of 550,000 KVA. Tourism Lishui is well-known in China for its long history and beautiful landscapes. Yan Yu Lou (misty rain tower) was built during the Northern Song Dynasty (AD 960-1127). Many famous ancient poets praised the tower’s beauty. Other recommendable scenic spots are Fengyangshan-Baishanzu National Natural Resort, Xiandu National Park, and Shishi Temple. Shishi Temple is a wooden structure built during the Song and Yuan Dynasties (AD 960-1368). The most characteristic local dishes are Jade Mutton Roll, Shan Fen Ball, Anren Fish with Bean-curd and Xian Cai Hot Pot. See also * List of people from Lishui * She Ethnicity (She people) References


Nampula

during the 1950s and 1960s, attracting thousands of Portuguese settlers to the country. It was around this time that the first nationalist guerrilla groups began to form in Tanzania and other African countries. The strong industrial and agricultural development that did occur throughout the 1950s, 1960s and early 1970s was based on Portuguese development plans, and also included British and South African investment. Although the Portuguese people

. The economy expanded rapidly during the 1950s and 1960s, attracting thousands of Portuguese settlers to the country. It was around this time that the first nationalist guerrilla groups began to form in Tanzania and other African countries. The strong industrial and agricultural development that did occur throughout the 1950s, 1960s and early 1970s was based on Portuguese development plans, and also included British and South African investment. The first optometry course in Mozambique


Beira, Mozambique

and other African countries. The strong industrial and agricultural development that did occur throughout the 1950s, 1960s and early 1970s was based on Portuguese development plans, and also included British and South African investment. * Beira (Beira, Mozambique), Mozambique, since 1995 East-West * There are several ways to cross Africa transcontinentally by connecting west-east railroads. One

with other Portuguese colonies, was put under the direct control of Lisbon. In 1951, it became an overseas province. The economy expanded rapidly during the 1950s and 1960s, attracting thousands of Portuguese settlers to the country. It was around this time that the first nationalist guerrilla groups began to form in Tanzania and other African countries. The strong industrial and agricultural development that did occur throughout the 1950s, 1960s and early 1970s was based on Portuguese development


Al-Bassa

, installed a system of running water, and oversaw the convening of a wholesale produce market there every Sunday. An agricultural cooperative in the village counted over 150 members that promoted agricultural development, while also providing loans to local farmers. The population of about 4,000 was divided almost evenly between Muslims and Christians. Among the village institutions were a government run elementary school, a "National High School", a Greek Orthodox church, a Catholic


Colony of Jamaica

prices, droughts, and disease led to serious social unrest, culminating in the Morant Bay rebellions of 1865. However, renewed British administration after the 1865 rebellion, in the form of crown colony status, resulted in some social and economic progress as well as investment in the physical infrastructure. Agricultural development was the centrepiece of restored British rule in Jamaica. In 1868 the first large-scale irrigation project was launched. In 1895 the Jamaica Agricultural Society was founded to promote more scientific and profitable methods of farming. Also in the 1890s, the Crown Lands Settlement Scheme was introduced, a land reform program of sorts, which allowed small farmers to purchase two hectares or more of land on favourable terms. Between 1865 and 1930, the character of landholding in Jamaica changed substantially, as sugar declined in importance. As many former plantations went bankrupt, some land was sold to Jamaican peasants under the Crown Lands Settlement whereas other cane fields were consolidated by dominant British producers, most notably by the British firm Tate and Lyle (Tate & Lyle). Although the concentration of land and wealth in Jamaica was not as drastic as in the Spanish-speaking Caribbean (Spanish Caribbean), by the 1920s the typical sugar plantation on the island had increased to an average of 266 hectares. But, as noted, smallscale agriculture in Jamaica survived the consolidation of land by sugar powers. The number of small holdings in fact tripled between 1865 and 1930, thus retaining a large portion of the population as peasantry. Most of the expansion in small holdings took place before 1910, with farms averaging between two and twenty hectares. The rise of the banana trade during the second half of the nineteenth century also changed production and trade patterns on the island. Bananas were first exported in 1867, and banana farming grew rapidly thereafter. By 1890, bananas had replaced sugar as Jamaica's principal export. Production rose from 5 million stems (32 percent of exports) in 1897 to an average of 20 million stems a year in the 1920s and 1930s, or over half of domestic exports. As with sugar, the presence of American companies, like the well-known United Fruit Company in Jamaica, was a driving force behind renewed agricultural exports. The British also became more interested in Jamaican bananas than in the country's sugar. Expansion of banana production, however, was hampered by serious labour shortages. The rise of the banana economy took place amidst a general exodus of up to 11,000 Jamaicans a year. The Great Depression caused sugar prices to slump in 1929 and led to the return of many Jamaicans. Economic stagnation, discontent with unemployment, low wages, high prices, and poor living conditions caused social unrest in the 1930s (British West Indian labour unrest of 1934–1939). Uprisings in Jamaica began on the Frome Sugar Estate in the western parish of Westmoreland (Westmoreland Parish) and quickly spread east to Kingston (Kingston, Jamaica). Jamaica, in particular, set the pace for the region in its demands for economic development from British colonial rule. Because of disturbances in Jamaica and the rest of the region, the British in 1938 appointed the Moyne Commission (Report of West India Royal Commission (Moyne Report)). An immediate result of the Commission was the Colonial Development Welfare Act, which provided for the expenditure of approximately Ł1 million a year for twenty years on coordinated development in the British West Indies. Concrete actions, however, were not implemented to deal with Jamaica's massive structural problems. The expanding relationship that Jamaica entered into with the United States during World War II produced a momentum for change that could not be turned back by the end of the war. Familiarity with the early economic progress achieved in Puerto Rico under Operation Bootstrap, renewed immigration to the United States, the lasting impressions of Marcus Garvey, and the publication of the Moyne Commission Report led to important modifications in the Jamaican political process and demands for economic development. As was the case throughout the Commonwealth Caribbean in the mid- to late 1930s, social upheaval in Jamaica paved the way for the emergence of strong trade unions and nascent political parties (Politics of Jamaica). These changes set the stage for early modernisation in the 1940s and 1950s and for limited self-rule, introduced in 1944. An extensive period of postwar growth transformed Jamaica into an increasingly industrial society. This pattern was accelerated with the export of bauxite beginning in the 1950s. The economic structure shifted from a dependence on agriculture that in 1950 accounted for 30.8 percent of GDP to an agricultural contribution of 12.9 percent in 1960 and 6.7 percent in 1970. During the same period, the contribution to GDP of mining increased from less than 1 percent in 1950 to 9.3 percent in 1960 and 12.6 percent in 1970. Manufacturing expanded from 11.3 percent in 1950 to 12.8 in 1960 and 15.7 in 1970. See also *Invasion of Jamaica (1655) *Jamaica *History of Jamaica *History of the British West Indies References Colony of Jamaica (Category:History of Jamaica) Category:Former countries in the Caribbean Category:British West Indies Category:Former British colonies (Category:Colony of Jamaica) Category:Former colonies in North America


Khakassia

), are a Turkic (Turkic languages)-speaking people, who live in Russia, in the republic of Khakassia in southern Siberia. They speak the Khakas language. - ! bgcolor "#ccccff" style "padding:0 0 0 50px;" Republic of Khakassia (Khakassia), Russia width "50px" 50px Flag of Khakassia (Image:Flag of Khakassia.svg) Most of Shors live in the Tom (Tom River) basin (drainage basin) along the Kondoma (Kondoma River) and Mras-Su Rivers. This region is historically called Mountainous Shoria. The Shors also live


Kemerovo Oblast

Russia, espеcially its southern territories (nowadays Altai Krai, Omsk Oblast, Novosibirsk Oblast, Kemerovo Oblast, Khakassia, Irkutsk Oblast). Stolypin's program (Stolypin reform) of resettlement granted a lot of land for immigrants from elsewhere in the empire, creating a large portion of well-off peasants and stimulating rapid agricultural development in 1910s. Local merchants exported large quantities of labeled grain, flour and butter into central Russia and Western


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