Places Known For

active member


Mahabad

in Sulaimaniya in Iraqi Kurdistan, where he was arrested. He was released after a while. After the agreements of 11 March 1970, which allowed the Kurdish insurgents and Baghdad's central government a four years' respite, Hemin settled down in Baghdad and became an active member of the Kurdish Academy of Science. birth_date 1920 birth_place Mahabad, Eastern Kurdistan death_date 1991 Biography Hejar was born in the city of Mahabad in north-western Iran. He began religious studies in early childhood, but was forced to abandon it when he lost his father at the age of 17. He started writing poems in Kurdish (Kurdish language) around 1940. Through his readings, he came under the influence of famous Kurdish poets such as Malaye Jaziri, Ahmad Khani, Wafaei and Haji Qadir Koyi. He was involved in the Kurdish movement led by Qazi Muhammad and was appointed as one of the official poets of the Republic of Mahabad in 1947. After the fall of the republic, he was forced into exile. For about 30 years, he lived in different countries such as Iraq, Syria, Lebanon and Egypt. In Iraq, he became involved in the nationalist movement led by Mustafa Barzani, with whom he developed a close friendship. In 1975, after the defeat of the movement, he moved back to Iran, and settled in the city of Karaj, where he lived until his death on February 22, 1990. He is buried in his home town of Mahabad. DATE OF BIRTH 1920 PLACE OF BIRTH Mahabad, Eastern Kurdistan DATE OF DEATH February 22, 1990 Early life and career Nali was born in Khaku-Khol, a village belongs to Sharbajer area or Shahrazur or Sharazur in Sulaimany, Kurdistan region of Iraq. As was the custom in the old days in Kurdistan, he started studying the Quran first and Arabic language in mosques in Kurdistan, then he became a Faqi. “Faqi is a Mullah’s student, which is the name of students in mosques. During the process of becoming a Faqi, he visited many cities in the whole of Kurdistan or Iran and Iraq, cities like; Sennah, Mahabad, Halabja, and Sulaimany. In Qaradakh he studied under Shaikh Muhammed Ibin al Khayat, in Sulaimany in Saiyd Hasan Mosque, he studied under Mullah Abdoullah Rash, also in Qaradax he studied mathematics under Shaikh Ali Mullah. He spent long time in the Khanaqa of Mawlana Khalid in Sulaimany. He also studied under Shaikh Awla Kharpani. '''Wafaei''' or '''Wefayî''', (1844-1902), was a Kurdish (Kurdish people) poet. His real name was ''Abdorrahim''. He was born in Mahabad in present-day north-western Iran. He finished religious studies in Mahabad and became a cleric, and a teacher in the local school. He moved to Sulaimaniya in 1900 and stayed there for a while. He travelled to Mecca three times, the last one in 1902. He was accompanied by the Kurdish poet Piramerd. During his last pilgrimage, he became ill and died in the region between Iraq and Syria. Since Mamle was a Kurdish political activist, he was arrested several times by the Iranian government. He died on the 13 January 1999 at the age of 74 in the Kurdish city of Mahabad, and was buried there in the Budak Sultan graves. He is very popular in all over Kurdistan region especially in his hometown Mahabad and the neighuring Piranshahr. Kurdish Women in Iran During World War I, Kurdish women suffered from attacks of Russian and Turkish armies. In 1915, Russian army massacred the male population of Mahabad and abused two hundred women. Reza Shah issued his decree for coercive unveiling of women in 1936. According to government correspondence, there was no need for unveiling in Kurdistan (Iranian Kurdistan), since women were usually unveiled. Nevertheless, government treated the colorful traditional Kurdish female custome as ''ugly and dirty'' and it had to be replaced with ''civilized''(i.e. Western) dress. Kurds called this forced dress as Ajami rather than European. ''Violence and culture: Confidential records about the abolition of hijab 1934-1943'', Iran National Archives, Tehran, 1992, pp.171, 249-250, 273. The Solitude of the Stateless: Kurdish Women at the Margins of Feminist Knowledge On July 13, unconfirmed reports began to emerge of a general strike in the four largely-Kurdish (w:Kurdish people) provinces in the north-west of Iran which make up Iranian Kurdistan (w:Iranian Kurdistan). Videos showed empty, deserted streets and shuttered shops in Mahabad (w:Mahabad), Saghez (w:Saghez) and other Kordestani cities. The reports of the strike coincide with the twentieth anniversary of the murder of Abdul Rahman Ghassemlou (w:Abdul Rahman Ghassemlou), the leader of the Kurdistan Democratic Party of Iran (w:Kurdistan Democratic Party of Iran) (PDKI).


Mbarara

. With significance for all Ugandan cities, Mbarara was the host to the 2004 Annual General Meeting of the Uganda Local Governments Association, on 1 October, which saw the changing of the organisation to its current structure in order to represent all Ugandan local governments. Mbarara remains an active member of this governmental association. WikiPedia:Mbarara


Republic of Mahabad

was arrested. He was released after a while. After the agreements of 11 March 1970, which allowed the Kurdish insurgents and Baghdad's central government a four years' respite, Hemin settled down in Baghdad and became an active member of the Kurdish Academy of Science. Biography Hejar was born in the city of Mahabad in north-western Iran. He began religious studies in early childhood, but was forced to abandon it when he lost his father at the age of 17. He started writing poems in Kurdish (Kurdish language) around 1940. Through his readings, he came under the influence of famous Kurdish poets such as Malaye Jaziri, Ahmad Khani, Wafaei and Haji Qadir Koyi. He was involved in the Kurdish movement led by Qazi Muhammad and was appointed as one of the official poets of the Republic of Mahabad in 1947. After the fall of the republic, he was forced into exile. For about 30 years, he lived in different countries such as Iraq, Syria, Lebanon and Egypt. In Iraq, he became involved in the nationalist movement led by Mustafa Barzani, with whom he developed a close friendship. In 1975, after the defeat of the movement, he moved back to Iran, and settled in the city of Karaj, where he lived until his death on February 22, 1990. He is buried in his home town of Mahabad. Republic of Mahabad encouraged women's participation in public life and KDPI launched a political party for women which promoted education for females and rallied their support for the republic. S. Mojab, ''Women and Nationalism in the Kurdish Republic of 1946'' in Women of a non-state nation, The Kurds, ed. by Shahrzad Mojab, Costa Mesa Publishers, 2001, pp.71-91 In August 1979, the Iranian Army launched an offensive to destroy the autonomist movement in Kurdistan (Iranian Kurdistan). Kurdish organizations such as Komala recruited hundreds of women into their military and political ranks. Within its own camps, Komala abolished gender segregation and women took part in combat and military training. ***My judgement is based on the following: - there exists an article called History of the Kurds and in this article is a section called History_of_the_Kurds#Modern_History_of_the_Kurds with a link to a main article called Modern history of the Kurds which is currently redlinked. The section in question covers the period 1828-present day. There currently isn't any reference to the two items of information in Kingdom of Kurdistan which are an attempt at independence from the British mandate which did not last long and an attempt at independence from Turkey which did not last long. These two pieces of information are part of the modern history of the Kurds and should be referenced there. An article about independence struggles in Kurdistan would have more than just two basic pieces of information and would not be called Kingdom of Kurdistan. There should in my view be an article on the modern history of Kurdistan and at most, the information presented in Kingdom of Kurdistan would be a small section within that. MLA (User:MLA) 19:32, 2 March 2006 (UTC) ****The key words in your kind reply are "redlinked" and "should", which only confirm my opinion that the nomination for deletion was a bit of misunderstanding. You just don't delete information from wikipedia just because it should be a part of the article which '''does not exist''' yet. I am not in a position to evaluate the validity of the term "Kingdom of Kurdistan"; I may understand the position that if someone proclaims himself King, this does not necessarily mean that there is a "Kingdom". But this is a different issue, and again, you just '''don't''' delete a correct and significant information from wikipedia. We already have an article about Republic of Mahabad, which was just as shortlived. Mukadderat (User:Mukadderat) 22:19, 2 March 2006 (UTC) *****Hmm.... Republic of Mahabad was also called kingdom of kurdistan... I for one am confused in this flood of 3 kingdoms with identical titles. Even a disambiguation page would be hard to create. Since all 3 of the kingdoms existed ceased to exist repetively in the same time period. It is perfectly fine to explain this under a "modern hostory of kurds" rather than pathetic individual articles that cannot grow beyond stubs. Each article can hardly fill a stub.


Belgorod Oblast

, he graduated from the Alekseevskii vocational technical school. In the mid-to-late 1920s, Kirilenko started working for a mining enterprise (Enterprises in the Soviet Union) located in the Voronezh Oblast. He became an active member of Komsomol in 1929 and, two years later, became a member of the All-Union Communist Party (All-Union Communist Party (Bolsheviks)). In 1936, he graduated from the Rybinsk Aviation Technology Institute. He started working as a design engineer


Latin Union

-Technicalities-blocking-RP-bid-for-OIC-observer-status "DFA: ‘Technicalities’ blocking RP bid for OIC observer status" . (2009-05-26). ''GMA News''. Retrieved 2009-07-10. ::::What do you think about handling the Latin Monetary Union? GFD uses one code, and refers to Union Latine lira, Union Latine franc, etc. It makes sense to me that it's just one currency, but I'd rather have one name for it. The best I can think of is "Latin Union currency" ::::Unless the idea sounds bad to you, I'm thinking of creating a page for Latin Union currency which links to Latin Union and mentions how the currencies had different names and patterns, but were interchangeable and thus really one currency. Then, I'll link to the page from "Latin Union lira", "Latin Union franc", etc. with a reference on the "Italian lira", "French franc", etc. pages. Then, we can use "Latin Union lira" or LU whatever in our boxes. Sound reasonable? Ingrid (User:Mom2jandk) 15:48, 18 January 2006 (UTC) Another issue: I just looked in SCWC (Standard Catalog of World Coins) and saw that the A-H krone was called "corona" on the Austrian coins. It was "koruna" on the Hungarian coins. I see (on the web) that the banknotes said "krone", I just found that odd, and will mention it in the updated article, whenever I update it. Ingrid (User:Mom2jandk) 15:48, 18 January 2006 (UTC)


Voronezh Oblast

technical school. In the mid-to-late 1920s, Kirilenko started working for a mining enterprise (Enterprises in the Soviet Union) located in the Voronezh Oblast. He became an active member of Komsomol in 1929 and, two years later, became a member of the All-Union Communist Party (All-Union Communist Party (Bolsheviks)). In 1936, he graduated from the Rybinsk Aviation Technology Institute. He started working as a design engineer for the aircraft factory, Zaporizhia Engine Plant


Liverpool, Nova Scotia

an active

member of the town for 50 years until his death in 1812. Nineteenth century During the nineteenth century, the town became a major seaport as the fishing and ship building industries grew. The town also became a leading exporter of timber which was floated down the Mersey River (or as initially called the ''Rivière Rossignol'' by the original Acadians) from the inland forests of the Lake Rossignol watershed. For a time after the War of 1812, Liverpool was second only to Halifax as the major port in the province, but was later eclipsed by western ports on the north shore of the province such as Pictou and New Glasgow on the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The mid-nineteenth century move toward steam-powered vessels which were built with steel, ruined the area's vibrant wooden-ship building industry, and the further financial dislocation caused by the collapse of the local Bank of Liverpool in 1871 combined to severely hurt the town's economy and it went into a slow decline. Twentieth century Liverpool's fortunes were temporarily revived in the 1920s when it became a centre for rum-runners (Rum-running) shipping alcohol to the United States during its period of prohibition. More significant growth took place in 1929 when the Mersey Pulp and Paper Mill (Bowater Mersey Paper Company Limited) was completed in the adjoining village of Brooklyn (Brooklyn, Queens County, Nova Scotia). The paper company also founded its own shipping line, the Markland Shipping Company based in Liverpool. World War II bolstered the economy further as the town's shipyard, Thompson Bros. Machinery Co. Ltd. became a major player in refitting Royal Canadian Navy corvettes and minesweeper (minesweeper (ship))s. In 1996, Liverpool disincorporated as a town and merged with the Municipality of the County of Queens to form the Region of Queens Municipality (Region of Queens Municipality, Nova Scotia). The Bowater Mersey Pulp and Paper plant closed in 2012. "Bowater Mersey Closes Down", ''CBC News'', June 15, 2012 Geography Liverpool is situated on the Atlantic coast along Nova Scotia's South Shore. The community primarily occupies the west bank of the mouth of the Mersey River (Mersey River (Nova Scotia)) and along its harbour front faces opposite the smaller community of Brooklyn (Brooklyn, Queens County, Nova Scotia) which is situated on the east bank of the River. Beyond Liverpool, the river widens to become an estuary called Liverpool Bay, which is partially sheltered by Coffin Island, and there melds into the Atlantic Ocean. The Gulf Stream which passes just to the east of Nova Scotia in the Atlantic Ocean provides Liverpool with a year-round temperate northern climate. Liverpool is located along Trunk Route 3 ("The Lighthouse Route") and at the junction of major Highway 103 (at Exit 19) and Trunk Route 8 ("The Kejimkujik Scenic Drive") which leads to the Bay of Fundy. '''Milton, Nova Scotia''' is a village located immediately north of Liverpool, Nova Scotia in the Region of Queens (Region of Queens Municipality, Nova Scotia) Nova Scotia. The village is most well known for being the birth place of the international best selling author Margaret Marshall Saunders. Her most famous book was Beautiful Joe. In 1994, the Beautiful Joe Heritage Society was formed to celebrate the life and story of ''Beautiful Joe'' and the achievements of Margaret Marshall Saunders. The book is set in Meaford, Ontario, where the society has established a park dedicated to Beautiful Joe named Beautiful Joe Park. thumb View of Caledonia (File:Caledonia - Queens County.jpg) '''Caledonia, Nova Scotia''' is a village located in northern Region of Queens Municipality (Region of Queens Municipality, Nova Scotia), Nova Scotia along Trunk 8 (Nova Scotia Trunk 8) (Kejimkujik Scenic Drive). It is about 30 miles north of Liverpool (Liverpool, Nova Scotia). 11 miles north of Caledonia, in Maitland Bridge,is the main entrance to Kejimkujik National Park. Caledonia is the major village in the area known as North Queens, which has a radius of approximately 20 miles and a population of approximately 1500. The N.F. Douglas lumber mill in Caledonia is one of the area's main employers. Other industries include forestry, farming, a blueberry processing operation, the Nova Scotia Liquor Commission outlet store and Kejimkujik National Park. North Queens School provides education from grades primary to twelve. The original settlers of Caledonia were six Scots and an Irishman, who settled on the seven hills in greater Caledonia, and the names in the area reflect this heritage. In 1884, Caledonia served as the hub for the gold rush in the nearby communities of Whiteburne and North Brookfield. Each September, Caledonia plays host to the Queens County Fair, which includes a parade, agricultural exhibition and midway. Raddall's first job was as a wireless operator on seagoing ships (including the famous cable ship CS ''Mackay-Bennett'' (CS Mackay-Bennett)), and at isolated wireless posts such as Sable Island. He later took a job as a clerk at a pulp and paper mill in Liverpool (Liverpool, Nova Scotia), Nova Scotia, where he began his writing career. Raddall was a prolific, award-winning writer. He received Governor General's Awards for three of his books, ''The Pied Piper of Dipper Creek'' (1943 (1943 Governor General's Awards)), ''Halifax, Warden of the North'' (1948 (1948 Governor General's Awards)) and ''The Path of Destiny'' (1957 (1957 Governor General's Awards)). In 1971, he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada. Upon her purchase by the Government of New Brunswick ''Vacationland'' was renamed MV ''Fundy Paradise'' with the intention of using her for service between Blacks Harbour (Blacks Harbour, New Brunswick) and Grand Manan Island. Funding for making modifications to the docks at both terminals for accepting the ship was never approved and she was towed to the Steel and Engine Products Ltd. shipyard in Liverpool (Liverpool, Nova Scotia), Nova Scotia where she was mothballed until the Government of New Brunswick decided to dispose of her in 2001. Historical context – Atlantic Canada The 84th was tasked with defending British maritime provinces (Atlantic Canada) from American Revolutionary attacks by land and sea. Throughout the war, American privateers devastated the maritime economy by raiding many of the coastal communities. There were constant attacks by American privateers, Benjamin Franklin also engaged France in the war, which meant that many of the privateers were also from France. such as the Sack of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia (1782), numerous raids on Liverpool, Nova Scotia (October 1776, March 1777, September, 1777, May 1778, September 1780) and a raid on Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia (1781). Roger Marsters (2004). ''Bold Privateers: Terror, Plunder and Profit on Canada's Atlantic Coast" , p. 87-89. There was also a naval engagement (Naval battle off Cape Breton) with a French fleet at Sydney, Nova Scotia, near Spanish River, Cape Breton (1781). Thomas B. Akins. (1895) History of Halifax. Dartmouth: Brook House Press.p. 82 Colonel Simeon Perkins was born in Norwich, Connecticut, one of sixteen children of Jacob Perkins and Jemima Leonard. He came to Liverpool, Nova Scotia, in May 1762 as part of the New England Planter (New England Planters) migration to Nova Scotia. Converse, Charles Allen (1905). ''Some of the Ancestors and Descendants of Samuel Converse, Jr.'', Vol. II, pp. 833-34. Boston: Eben Putnam. In Liverpool, Perkins immediately began trading in fish and lumber and forged trading ties with New England, Newfoundland, Europe and the West Indies. Perkins House Museum Perkins' home in Liverpool, Nova Scotia is open to the public and guided tours are given from June until October. It was purchased by the Province of Nova Scotia and opened as part of the Nova Scotia Museum system at the suggestion of the author Thomas Raddall who lived in Liverpool. "Thomas Raddall Selected Correspondence: An Electronic Edition"


Socialist Republic of Slovenia

Yugoslav republics did not agree with this new way of selecting the representative to the Collective Presidency, so the Slovenian Republic Parliament had to confirm the result of the elections. Drnovšek served as chairman of the Collective Presidency from 1989 until 1990. While he was chairman of the presidency, he was also chairman of the Non-Aligned Movement and the commander of the Yugoslav People's Army. Until the collapse of the Communist regime he was an active member of the Communist Party. After the democratic changes in Slovenia, the country seceded from Yugoslavia. Following the Ten Day War, Drnovšek used his position in the Collective Presidency to help mediate the Brioni Agreement and to negotiate a peaceful withdrawal of Yugoslav army (Yugoslav People's Army) from Slovenia. Life Žižek was born in Ljubljana, Socialist Republic of Slovenia, Yugoslavia (Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia), to a middle-class family. His father Jože Žižek was an economist and civil servant from the region of Prekmurje in eastern Slovenia. His mother Vesna, native of the Brda (Brda, Slovenia) region in the Slovenian Littoral, was an accountant in a state enterprise. ''Slovenski biografski leksikon'' (Ljubljana: SAZU (Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts), 1991), XV. edition Gorizia and Gradisca thus ceased to exist as a unified historical region. Its Yugoslav portion became an integral part of the Socialist Republic of Slovenia: most of its territory was included in the Goriška region, except for the Kras plateau which was incorporated into the Littoral-Kras statistical region. A new urban center, called Nova Gorica ("New Gorizia") was built between the late 1940s and in the early 1950s. The Italian portion became part of the Friuli-Venezia Giulia autonomous region, mostly included in the Province of Gorizia. Parallel to the same process, Slovenia (Socialist Republic of Slovenia) witnessed a policy of gradual liberalization since 1984, not unlike the Soviet Perestroika. This provoked tensions between the League of Communists of Slovenia on one side, and the central Yugoslav Party and the Federal Army (Yugoslav People's Army) on the other side. In mid May 1988, the Peasant Union of Slovenia was organized as the first non-Communist political organization in the country. Later in the same month, the Yugoslav Army arrested four Slovenian journalists of the alternative magazine ''Mladina'', accusing them of revealing state secrets. The so-called Ljubljana trial triggered mass protests in Ljubljana and other Slovenian cities. The Committee for the Defence of Human Rights was established as the platform of all major non-Communist political movements. By early 1989, several anti-Communist political parties were already openly functioning, challenging the hegemony of the Slovenian Communists. Soon, the Slovenian Communists, pressured by their own civil society, entered in conflict with the Serbian Communist leadership. *Albanians are committing genocide against Serbs in Kosovo (Socialist Autonomous Province of Kosovo) (pgs. 41, 56 of memorandum) *Slovenia (Socialist Republic of Slovenia) and Croatia (Socialist Republic of Croatia) are taking control of the Serbian economy. Yugoslavia (Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia) is taking industry out of Serbia (Socialist Republic of Serbia) (pg. 42) *There is need for constitutional changes of Yugoslavia (Constitution of Yugoslavia) because of its unfair mistreating and weakening of Serbia (pg. 46) Life He was born in Maribor, an industrial center in what was then the Yugoslav (Yugoslavia) Socialist Republic of Slovenia. His father, originally from the Prekmurje region, was a former partisan (Partisans (Yugoslavia)). Jančar studied law in his home town. While a student, he became chief editor of the student journal ''Katedra''; he soon came in conflict with the Communist (Communist Party of Slovenia) establishment because he published some articles critical of the ruling regime. He had to leave the journal. He soon found a job as an assistant at the Maribor daily newspaper ''Večer (Večer (Maribor))''. In 1974 he was arrested by Yugoslav (Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia) authorities for bringing to Yugoslavia a booklet entitled ''V Rogu ležimo pobiti'' (''We Lie Killed in the Rog Forest''), which he had bought in nearby Austria and lent to some friends. The booklet was a survivor's account of the Kočevski Rog massacres of the Slovene Home Guard war prisoners perpetrated by Josip Broz Tito's regime in May 1945. He was sentenced to a year's imprisonment for "spreading hostile propaganda" but was released after three months. Immediately after his release he was called up for military service in southern Serbia, where he was subjected to systematic harassment by his superiors due to his "criminal file".


Cienfuegos

, taking part in a high-school protest in Cienfuegos in November 1950 that involved students fighting a four-hour battle with police in protest at the Education Ministry's ban on the founding of student associations in schools. He was arrested and charged with using violence against police officers, but the magistrate later dismissed the charges. Coltman 2003 (#Col03). p. 53. He also became an active member of the Cuban Peace Committee, a part of the international campaign led by British intellectual Betrand Russell to oppose western involvement in the Korean War. His hopes for Cuba still largely centred around Eduardo Chibás and his left wing Partido Ortodoxo; however Chibás had made a mistake when he accused Education Minister Aureliano Sánchez of purchasing a Guatamalan ranch with misappropriated funds, but was unable to substantiate his allegations. The government used this as an opportunity to go on the offensive against Chibás, accusing him of being a liar and a troublemaker. In 1951, while running for president again, Chibás shot himself in the stomach during a radio broadcast in an attempt to issue a "last wake-up call" to the Cuban people. Castro was present and accompanied him to the hospital where he died of his injuries. Von Tunzelmann 2011 (#Von11). p. 44. Castro and Ramonet 2009 (#Cas09). pp. 85–87. Coltman 2003 (#Col03). pp. 46, 53–55. Bourne 1986 (#Bou86). pp. 58–59. The traditional sugar industry, upon which the island's economy has been based for three centuries, is centred elsewhere on the island and controls some three-fourths of the export economy. But light manufacturing facilities, meat-packing plants, and chemical and pharmaceutical operations are concentrated in Havana. Other food-processing industries are also important, along with shipbuilding, vehicle manufacturing, production of alcoholic beverages (particularly rum), textiles, and tobacco products, particularly the world-famous Habanos cigars.


Sovereign Military Order of Malta

leader called Zuzo. An important early landowner was the monastery of Bad Säckingen. '''Carl Nicholas Karcher, SMOM (Sovereign Military Order of Malta)''' (January 16, 1917 – January 11, 2008) was an American (United States) businessman, founder of the Carl's Jr. hamburger chain, now owned by parent company CKE Restaurants, Inc. (CKE Restaurants) Personal life Karcher was an active member of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta. Carl and Margaret Karcher had 12 children. Their son Jerome T. Karcher, who is a priest in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange, received the Man of Character Award from the Boy Scouts of America for founding Mercy House in Orange County (Orange County, California) for the homeless and those with AIDS. Mercy House National symbols Various symbols have identified the island over its history, the most common is the Maltese cross, the symbol used by the Knights of Malta (Sovereign Military Order of Malta) and now a symbol of the Maltese nation. It appears on the reverse of the Maltese 1 euro and 2 euro coins (Maltese euro coins#Maltese euro designs) introduced in January 2008. http: finance.gov.mt Structure of the Order The order is not to be confused with the Sovereign Military Order of Malta or other members of The Alliance of the Orders of St. John of Jerusalem. There are also "copycat" organisations using the St John name which are not generally recognised by members of the Alliance of Orders of St John. thumb left Countess Marie Hengelmüller von Hengervár, ''née'' Dunin-Borkowska (File:Countess Marie Dunir Borowska Hengelmuller.jpg) Baron Hengelmüller von Hengervár was present on 10 January 1908 at the Waldorf Astoria (Waldorf-Astoria Hotel) in New York when the American Priory of the Sovereign Order of Saint John of Jerusalem (Sovereign Military Order of Malta) was officially incorporated. Knights of Malta In 1909, he signed an arbitration treaty between the United States and the Austro-Hungarian Empire, which provided for a Permanent Court of Arbitration at The Hague. Arbitration Convention between the United States and Austria-Hungary Robinson is also a Knight of Magistral Grace of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta. He lives at Beckside House, Lancashire. Dr. Robinson is an active member of the Georgian Group. Her maternal grandmother was a sister of Francisco Javier de Ybarra y Bergé, born in 1913, Spanish businessman, who after the Spanish Civil War became President of the ''Diputación'' of Biscay (1947–1950) and afterwards ''Alcalde'' of Bilbao (1963–1969), Academic of the ''Real Academía de la Historia'', President of the daily newspaper ''Informaciones'', President of the ''Bilbao Editorial'', and editor of ''El Correo Español-El Pueblo Vasco''. Ybarra was sequestrated for a ransom and murdered (execution-style murder with a gunshot in the back of the head) by ETA in June 1977. http: cacho.gmxhome.de apc apc26.htm His sons are the genealogist Juan Antonio de Ybarra e Ybarra, writer and author and Knight of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta http: www.jaybarra.net (in Spanish) and Francisco Javier de Ybarra e Ybarra, author of the book ''Los Ybarra'', in which he tells the story of his family, which includes Gabriel de Ybarra and Emilio de Ybarra, and author of ''La Casa de Salcedo de Aranguren'', Bilbao, 1944, from which family they descend. * Independent sovereigns outside the Empire (such as the Sovereign Military Order of Malta Prince of the Holy Roman Empire (Reichsfürst) 1607, cf in 1620, Austrian prince (His Serene Highness) 27 December 1880, cf 1889 and 1905. Most Eminent Highness by Italian royal decree 1927 (long by usage). Papal Cardinal-rank 1630. ) * Sovereigns who were vassals, but outside its territory (i.e. the Prince of Piombino (Principality of Piombino)) The Cardinal was made Bailiff Grand Cross of Honour and Devotion of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta in 2005, appointed Grand Prior of the Scottish Lieutenancy of the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem in 2001 and appointed Knight Grand Cross (KGCHS) of that order in 2003. In addition, Shirvani served as editor and or on the editorial board of Journal of Architectural Education (1988–94); Avant Garde (1988–94); Journal of Planning Education and Research (1987–93); Urban Design and Presentation Quarterly (1987–89); Journal of the American Planning Association (1983–85); UD Review (1982–87); and Art and Architecture (1974–78). In October 2004, he was awarded the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem and was invested as a Knight of the Holy Sepulchre. He was invested as a Knight in the Sovereign Military Order of Malta in 2009. Sir Hamid Shirvani is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, Fellow of the World Academy of Art and Science, Recipient of Special Commendation by the American Institute of Architects (2003) for his contributions in the fields of architecture and urban design, Recipient of the Seikyo Culture Award of Japan (1999) and is listed in the Who’s Who in the World. Sir Hamid Shirvani has lectured at 27 international and 48 U.S. universities, several dozen public and private agencies, and professional societies. He is also the recipient of grants from National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, United States Department of Education, DeWitt Wallace – Reader’s Digest Fund and Temple Hoyne Buell Foundation. For his distinguished service and significant scholarly and academic achievements, Soka University (Japan) bestowed upon him the Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters in 2003. In 2007 and again in 2009, the statewide student government body of the 23-campus California State University system recognized Shirvani as “President of the Year.” honorific_prefix honorific_suffix Royal Victorian Order CVO , KStJ (Venerable Order of Saint John), FSA (Society of Antiquaries of London), FSG (Society of Genealogists), FHS (The Heraldry Society), FHG (Hon) (Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies), FRHSC (Hon) (Royal Heraldry Society of Canada), FHSNZ (The Heraldry Society (New Zealand Branch)), KM (Sovereign Military Order of Malta), GCGCO (Sacred Military Constantinian Order of Saint George) alternative names John Brooke-Little, JBL '''John Philip Rudolph Dominic Derek Aloysius Mary Brooke-Little''', "John Philip Brooke-Little" The Coat of Arms. Third Series Vol II No 212, (2006) 77. CVO (Royal Victorian Order), KStJ (Venerable Order of Saint John), FSA (Society of Antiquaries of London), FSG (Society of Genealogists), FHS (The Heraldry Society), FHG (Hon) (Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies), FRHSC (Hon) (Royal Heraldry Society of Canada), FHSNZ (The Heraldry Society (New Zealand Branch)), KM (Sovereign Military Order of Malta), GCGCO (Sacred Military Constantinian Order of Saint George) (6 April 1927 – 13 February 2006) was an influential and popular British (United Kingdom) writer on heraldic (heraldry) subjects and a long-serving officer of arms (Officer of Arms) at the College of Arms in London. In 1947, while still a student, Brooke-Little founded the Society of Heraldic Antiquaries, now known as The Heraldry Society and recognized as one of the leading learned societies in its field. He served as the society's chairman for 50 years and then as its President from 1997 until his death in 2006. In addition to the foundation of this group, Brooke-Little was involved in other heraldic groups and societies and worked for many years as an officer of arms; beginning as Bluemantle Pursuivant, Brooke-Little rose to the second highest heraldic office in England: Clarenceux King of Arms. In addition to his honours in the United Kingdom, Brooke-Little also served as Chancellor of the British Association of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta from 1973 to 1977. He was first admitted to the Order as a Knight of Magistral Grace, and would eventually hold the rank of Knight Grand Cross of Grace and Devotion. He was also honoured with the Order of Merito Melitense in 1964 and was made a Knight Grand Cross of Grace of the Sacred Military Constantinian Order of Saint George. The American College of Heraldry. In addition to these honours, he held the Cruz Distinguida (1st class) de San Raimundo de Penafort. Education and World War II Monckton was educated at Harrow School and then read agriculture at Trinity College, Cambridge, graduating in 1939. He converted to Roman Catholicism at Cambridge University, and was later a Knight of St John (Order of Malta). He was bailiff of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta, and was awarded the Grand Cross of Obedience. Viscount Monckton was an active supporter and long time member of the Sacred Military Constantinian Order of Saint George and held the rank of Bailiff Knight Grand Cross of Justice as well as Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Order of Francis I, its sister order. Criptana, located about two kilometers east of the present city center, was granted, under the name of Chitrana, by the Order of St. John (Sovereign Military Order of Malta) in 1162 to the Toledo (Toledo, Spain) Mozarab nobleman Miguel Assaraff in order that it be resettled. Later it passed to the Order of Santiago, forming the center of an estate that also had property in Villajos and Pedro Muñoz. By the 14th century it was again depopulated. - 100px (File:Flag of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta.svg) 1130 — Sovereign Military Order of Malta The flag of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta is a red rectangular flag quartered by a white cross. In June 2001, Lennon was installed as a Knight of Malta (Sovereign Military Order of Malta) and into the Knights of the Holy Sepulchre. Diocese of Cleveland - Bishops *Rock paintings and Neolithic archaeological remains *Collegiate church of Santa Maria la Mayor del Pilar (16th-17th centuries), located in the highest sector of the town. Founded by the Military Order of St. John (Sovereign Military Order of Malta) during the 13th century, it is one of the best example of Aragonese Gothic (Gothic architecture) architecture, with influences from the Cistercian style. It has a nave and two aisles, the former covered by cross vaults supported by semicolumns, in turn placed over pilasters. The transept area was added in 1515. The bell tower is modern, dating to 1818, while from the Gothic edifice is the western portal, built in 1412 and featuring a rich decoration with contrasts with the sober interior. *''Torre de Salamanca'', located on a hill outside the town and built by general Salamanca in 1874. History of the order The Order of Saint Lazarus (Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem) was established as a military and religious community at the time of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem, probably some years before 1090. Presuming a foundation date of 1099 for the Order of the Hospital (now the Sovereign Military Order of Malta), the Order of Saint Lazarus is arguably the oldest surviving of the medieval military-religious knightly orders. From its inception, the order was concerned with the relief of leprosy, and many of its members were lepers who had been knights in other orders. It became very rich, its practices dubious, and its funds much abused. With the fall of Acre (Siege of Acre (1291)) in 1291 the knights of St Lazarus fled the Holy Land and Egypt and settled in France and, in 1311, in Naples. In the sixteenth century, the order declined in credibility and wealth. With papal support, Duke of Savoy became Grand Master in 1572.


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017