Taghaza

blank5_info blank6_name blank6_info website footnotes '''Taghaza''' (also '''Teghaza''') is an abandoned salt-mining centre located in a salt pan (Dry lake) in the desert region of northern Mali. It was an important source of rock salt for West Africa up to the end of the 16th century when it was abandoned and replaced by the salt-pan at Taoudenni which lies

on to the southeast. Salt from the Taghaza mines formed an important part of the long distance trans-Saharan trade. The salt-pan is located north-northeast of Oualata (in Mauritania). Early Arabic sources The Taghaza mines are first mentioned by name (as Taghara) in around 1275 by the geographer Zakariya al-Qazwini al Qazwini


Sijilmasa

and after 25 days, arrived at the dry salt-lake bed of Taghaza with its salt mines. All of the local buildings were made from slabs of salt by slaves of the Masufa tribe, who cut the salt in thick slabs for transport by camel. Taghaza was a commercial centre and awash with Malian (Mali Empire) gold, though Ibn Battuta did not form a favourable impression of the place, recording that it was plagued by flies and the water was brackish. File:Aït Benhaddou1 (js).jpg thumb The Kasbah of Aït

.) UNESCO, James Curry Ltd., and Univ. Calif. Press., pp. 77-86. but also housed a European trading center (funduk) which connected African and European merchants. Talbi (1997: 29). In particular, Tlemcen was one of the points through which African gold (arriving from south of the Sahara via Sijilmasa or Taghaza) entered the European hands. Id. Consequently, Tlemcen was partially integrated into the European financial system. So

as Portrayed in the Documents of the Cairo Geniza'' '''Taghaza''' (also '''Teghaza''') is an abandoned salt-mining centre located in a salt pan (Dry lake) in the desert region of northern Mali. It was an important source of rock salt for West Africa up to the end of the 17th century when it was abandoned and replaced by Taoudenni. Salt from the mines formed an important part of the long distance trans-Saharan trade. Taghaza is located


Ghadames

the capital of the empire, Timbuktu enjoyed a relatively autonomous position. Merchants from Ghadames, Awjilah (Awjilah, Libya), and numerous other cities of North Africa gathered there to buy gold and slaves in exchange for the Saharan salt of Taghaza (History_of_salt#The_socio-political_history_of_salt) and for North African cloth and horses.


Djenné

historyanddescr02porygoog#page n138 mode 1up 822–823 Vol. 3 Between the 14th and 17th centuries Djenné and Timbuktu were important entrepôts in a long distance trade network. Salt was mined at Taghaza in the Sahara and transported south via Timbuktu and Djenné. Gold from the Akan goldfields in the forested area between the Komoé (Komoé River) and Volta (Volta River) rivers was traded at the town of Begho (Bitu) and then transported north through Djenné and Timbuktu

who deal in salt from the mine of Taghaza meet there with those who deal in gold from the mine of Bitu. ... This blessed city of Jenne is the reason why caravans come to Timbuktu from all quarters-north, south, east and west. Jenne is situated to the south and west of Timbuktu beyond the two rivers. When the river is in flood, Jenne becomes an island, but when the flood abates the water is far from it. It begins to be surrounded by water in August, and in February the water recedes again.

at the Saadi court. After a march across the Sahara desert, Judar's forces captured, plundered, and razed the salt mines at Taghaza and moved on to Gao. When Emperor Askia Ishaq II (r. 1588-1591) met Judar at the 1591 Battle of Tondibi, Songhai forces, despite vastly superior numbers, were routed by a cattle stampede triggered by the Saadi's gunpowder weapons. http: www.historyfiles.co.uk KingListsAfrica AfricaNiger.htm History Files Judar proceeded to sack Gao


Azawad

to flourish. With Gao as the capital of the empire, Timbuktu enjoyed a relatively autonomous position. Merchants from Ghadames, Awjilah (Awjilah, Libya), and numerous other cities of North Africa gathered there to trade gold and slaves in exchange for the Saharan salt of Taghaza (History of salt#The socio-political history of salt), and North African cloth and horses.


Elmina

was mined at Taghaza in the Sahara and transported south via Timbuktu and Djenné. Gold from the Akan goldfields in the forested area between the Komoé (Komoé River) and Volta (Volta River) rivers was traded at the town of Begho (Bitu) and then transported north through Djenné and Timbuktu and across the Sahara to North Africa where it was exchanged for merchandise such as cloth, copper and brass. ref name Wilks82a >


Ouagadougou

; primarily consisting of over 20 countries such as: present day Morocco (Taghaza), Algeria (Djayr), Tunisia (Tunis), Libya (Libu), Egypt (Kemet), Mauritania, Senegal, Gambia, Mali, Ancient Ghana (Ouagadougou), Niger and Nigeria were once one region, Burkino Faso, The Western Sahara (also Taghaza), South Africa, Sudan (Nubia), Somalia, Ethiopia (Kush (Kingdom of Kush)), Eritrea etc.) and Al-Maghreb Al


Timbuktu

a relatively autonomous position. Merchants from Ghadames, Awjilah (Awjilah, Libya), and numerous other cities of North Africa gathered there to buy gold and slaves in exchange for the Saharan salt of Taghaza (History of salt#The socio-political history of salt) and for North African cloth and horses.

on the verge of economic depletion and bankruptcy, as they needed to pay for the defenses used to hold off the siege) under the eunuch Judar Pasha. Judar Pasha was a Spaniard by birth, but had been captured as an infant and educated at the Saadi court. After a march across the Sahara desert, Judar's forces captured, plundered, and razed the salt mines at Taghaza and moved on to Gao. When Emperor Askia Ishaq II (r. 1588-1591) met Judar at the 1591 Battle of Tondibi, Songhai forces

with the Tuareg (Taureg people) whom Ali expelled to gain control of the town. '''Taghaza''' (also '''Teghaza''') is an abandoned salt-mining centre located in a salt pan (Dry lake) in the desert region of northern Mali. It was an important source of rock salt for West Africa up to the end of the 17th century when it was abandoned and replaced by Taoudenni. Salt from the mines formed an important part of the long distance trans-Saharan trade. Taghaza is located


Mauritania

; primarily consisting of over 20 countries such as: present day Morocco (Taghaza), Algeria (Djayr), Tunisia (Tunis), Libya (Libu), Egypt (Kemet), Mauritania, Senegal, Gambia, Mali, Ancient Ghana (Ouagadougou), Niger and Nigeria were once one region, Burkino Faso, The Western Sahara (also Taghaza), South Africa, Sudan (Nubia), Somalia, Ethiopia (Kush (Kingdom of Kush)), Eritrea etc.) and Al-Maghreb

but could supply salt, taken by places like the African salt mine of Taghaza, whereas West African countries like Wangara (Soninke Wangara) had plenty of gold but needed salt. The trans-Saharan slave trade was also important because large numbers of Africans were sent north, generally to serve as domestic servants or slave concubines. ''Ibn Battuta's Trip'': Part Twelve - Journey to West Africa


Marrakesh

train, and assembled eighty Christian bodyguards for his personal detail. In 1556-1557 troops of Mulay Muhammad al-Shaykh (Mohammed ash-Sheikh), the sultan of Marrakesh captured the salt mines of Taghaza but then withdrew. Soon after his accession in 1578 Sultan Ahmad I al-Mansur of Morocco demanded the tax revenues from the salt mines. Ashiya Dawud responded by sending a large quantity of gold as a gift.


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