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Kronstadt

, 767" Figes, 767. The workers of Petrograd were under martial law and could offer little support to Kronstadt. Orlando Figes, ''A People's Tragedy: The Russian Revolution 1891-1924'' (New York: Viking Press 1997), 760. Neo-Byzantine architecture had a small following in the wake of the 19th-century Gothic revival, resulting in such jewels as Westminster Cathedral in London, and in Bristol from about 1850 to 1880 a related style known as Bristol Byzantine was popular for industrial buildings which combined elements of the Byzantine style with Moorish architecture. It was developed on a wide-scale basis in Russia during the reign of Alexander II (Alexander II of Russia) by Grigory Gagarin and his followers who designed St Volodymyr's Cathedral in Kiev, St Nicholas Naval Cathedral (:Image:Kronstadt Naval Cathedral 1.jpg) in Kronstadt, Alexander Nevsky Cathedral in Sofia, Saint Mark's church (St. Mark's Church, Belgrade) in Belgrade and the New Athos Monastery in New Athos near Sukhumi. The largest Neo-Byzantine project of the 20th century was the Temple of Saint Sava in Belgrade. Touring Europe and Russia Between October 1772 and June 1775, Jervis travelled extensively. He began in France where he studied the language and made observations about French life. Tucker. Vol. 1, p.39 He accompanied Captain Samuel Barrington to Russia where they spent time in Saint Petersburg and inspected the arsenal and dockyards at Kronstadt and took a tour of the yacht designed by Sir Charles Knowles (Sir Charles Knowles, 1st Baronet) for Catherine of Russia (Catherine II of Russia). Tucker. Vol. 1, p.40 The pair continued on to Sweden, Denmark and northern Germany. All the while Jervis made notes on defences, harbour charts and safe anchorages. They came home via the Netherlands, Tucker. Vol. 1, p.46 Jervis once again making extensive studies of the area and taking copious notes describing any useful information. He and Barrington then took a private cruise along the Channel coast calling at various harbours including Brest (Brest, France), making and improving their charts as they went. When Jervis later became the Commander-in-Chief of the Channel Fleet he was aided significantly in his blockade of Brest by these charts. In later years, he commented: "Had the young Captain Jervis not performed such a complete survey of this port then the Earl St Vincent would not have been able to effect such a thorough blockade of it." Tucker. Vol. 2, p.15 * wikipedia:Kronstadt


Sukhumi

-1600-5. Neo-Byzantine architecture had a small following in the wake of the 19th-century Gothic revival, resulting in such jewels as Westminster Cathedral in London, and in Bristol from about 1850 to 1880 a related style known as Bristol Byzantine was popular for industrial buildings which combined elements of the Byzantine style with Moorish architecture. It was developed on a wide-scale basis in Russia during the reign of Alexander II (Alexander II of Russia) by Grigory Gagarin and his followers who designed St Volodymyr's Cathedral in Kiev, St Nicholas Naval Cathedral (:Image:Kronstadt Naval Cathedral 1.jpg) in Kronstadt, Alexander Nevsky Cathedral in Sofia, Saint Mark's church (St. Mark's Church, Belgrade) in Belgrade and the New Athos Monastery in New Athos near Sukhumi. The largest Neo-Byzantine project of the 20th century was the Temple of Saint Sava in Belgrade. - SUI UGSS Sukhumi Dranda Airport Sukhumi, Georgia (Georgia (country)) - - bgcolor "#F9F9F9" 1. align "left" Sukhumi align "left" Аҟәа სოხუმი 119,200 39,100 align "left" Sukhumi District - bgcolor "#F9F9F9" The Soviet Union Hertz, who was concerned for his safety and was looking, like his fellow Nobel laureate Franck, to move to the USA or any other place outside Germany, Manfred von Ardenne, director of his private laboratory ''Forschungslaboratorium für Elektronenphysik'', Peter Adolf Thiessen, ordinarius professor at the Humboldt University of Berlin and director of the Kaiser-Wilhelm Institut für physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie (KWIPC) in Berlin-Dahlem (Dahlem (Berlin)), and Max Volmer, ordinarius professor and director of the Physical Chemistry Institute at the Berlin Technische Hochschule (Technical University of Berlin), had made a pact. sachen.de – ''Zur Ehrung von Manfred von Ardenne''. The pact was a pledge that whoever first made contact with the Russians would speak for the rest. The objectives of their pact were threefold: (1) Prevent plunder of their institutes, (2) Continue their work with minimal interruption, and (3) Protect themselves from prosecution for any political acts of the past. Heinemann-Grüder, 2002, 44. Before the end of World War II, Thiessen, a member of the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (NSDAP), had Communist contacts. Hentschel, 1996, Appendix F; see the entry for Thiessen. On 27 April 1945, Thiessen arrived at von Ardenne’s institute in an armored vehicle with a major of the Soviet Army, who was also a leading Soviet chemist. Oleynikov, 2000, pp 5, 10–13, 18, 21 All four of the pact members were taken to the Soviet Union. Hertz was made head of Institute G, in Agudseri (Agudzery),about 10 km southeast of Sukhumi and a suburb of Gul’rips (Gulrip’shi). Naimark, 1995, 213. Topics assigned to Gustav Hertz’s Institute G included: (1) Separation of isotopes by diffusion in a flow of inert gases, for which Gustav Hertz was the leader, (2) Development of a condensation pump, for which Justus Mühlenpfordt was the leader, (3) Design and build a mass spectrometer for determining the isotopic composition of uranium, for which Werner Schütze was the leader, (4) Development of frameless (ceramic) diffusion partitions for filters, for which Reinhold Reichmann was the leader, and (5) Development of a theory of stability and control of a diffusion cascade, for which Heinz Barwich was the leader; Kruglov, 2002, 131. Barwich had been deputy to Hertz at Siemens. Naimark, 1995, 209. Other members of Institute G were Werner Hartmann (Werner Hartmann (physicist)) and Karl-Franz Zühlke. Maddrell, 2006, 179–180. Von Ardenne was made head of Institute A, Goals of Manfred von Ardenne’s Institute A included: (1) Electromagnetic separation of isotopes, for which von Ardenne was the leader, (2) Techniques for manufacturing porous barriers for isotope separation, for which Peter Adolf Thiessen was the leader, and (3) Molecular techniques for separation of uranium isotopes, for which Max Steenbeck was the leader. In his first meeting with Lavrentij Beria (Lavrentiy Beria), von Ardenne was asked to participate in building the bomb, but von Ardenne quickly realized that participation would prohibit his repatriation to Germany, so he suggested isotope enrichment as an objective, which was agreed to. By the end of the 1940s, nearly 300 Germans were working at the institute, and they were not the total work force. Institute A was used as the basis for the Sukhumi Physical-Technical Institute in Sinop, a suburb of Sukhumi. Volmer went to the Nauchno-Issledovatel’skij Institut-9 (NII-9, Scientific Research Institute No. 9), Today, NII-9 is the Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Bochvar VNIINM. See Oleynikov, 2000, 4. in Moscow; he was given a design bureau to work on the production of heavy water. In Institute A, Thiessen became leader for developing techniques for manufacturing porous barriers for isotope separation. The Soviet Union Hertz, who was concerned for his safety and was looking, like his fellow Nobel laureate Franck, to move to the USA or any other place outside Germany, Manfred von Ardenne, director of his private laboratory ''Forschungslaboratorium für Elektronenphysik'', Peter Adolf Thiessen, ordinarius professor at the Humboldt University of Berlin and director of the Kaiser-Wilhelm Institut für physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie (KWIPC) in Berlin-Dahlem (Dahlem (Berlin)), and Max Volmer, ordinarius professor and director of the Physical Chemistry Institute at the Berlin Technische Hochschule (Technical University of Berlin), had made a pact. sachen.de – ''Zur Ehrung von Manfred von Ardenne''. The pact was a pledge that whoever first made contact with the Russians would speak for the rest. The objectives of their pact were threefold: (1) Prevent plunder of their institutes, (2) Continue their work with minimal interruption, and (3) Protect themselves from prosecution for any political acts of the past. Heinemann-Grüder, 2002, 44. Before the end of World War II, Thiessen, a member of the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (NSDAP), had Communist contacts. Hentschel, 1996, Appendix F; see the entry for Thiessen. On 27 April 1945, Thiessen arrived at von Ardenne’s institute in an armored vehicle with a major of the Soviet Army, who was also a leading Soviet chemist. Oleynikov, 2000, pp 5, 10–13, 18, 21 All four of the pact members were taken to the Soviet Union. Hertz was made head of Institute G, in Agudseri (Agudzery),about 10 km southeast of Sukhumi and a suburb of Gul’rips (Gulrip’shi). Naimark, 1995, 213. Topics assigned to Gustav Hertz’s Institute G included: (1) Separation of isotopes by diffusion in a flow of inert gases, for which Gustav Hertz was the leader, (2) Development of a condensation pump, for which Justus Mühlenpfordt was the leader, (3) Design and build a mass spectrometer for determining the isotopic composition of uranium, for which Werner Schütze was the leader, (4) Development of frameless (ceramic) diffusion partitions for filters, for which Reinhold Reichmann was the leader, and (5) Development of a theory of stability and control of a diffusion cascade, for which Heinz Barwich was the leader; Kruglov, 2002, 131. Barwich had been deputy to Hertz at Siemens. Naimark, 1995, 209. Other members of Institute G were Werner Hartmann (Werner Hartmann (physicist)) and Karl-Franz Zühlke. Maddrell, 2006, 179–180. Von Ardenne was made head of Institute A, Goals of Manfred von Ardenne’s Institute A included: (1) Electromagnetic separation of isotopes, for which von Ardenne was the leader, (2) Techniques for manufacturing porous barriers for isotope separation, for which Peter Adolf Thiessen was the leader, and (3) Molecular techniques for separation of uranium isotopes, for which Max Steenbeck was the leader. In his first meeting with Lavrentij Beria (Lavrentiy Beria), von Ardenne was asked to participate in building the bomb, but von Ardenne quickly realized that participation would prohibit his repatriation to Germany, so he suggested isotope enrichment as an objective, which was agreed to. By the end of the 1940s, nearly 300 Germans were working at the institute, and they were not the total work force. Institute A was used as the basis for the Sukhumi Physical-Technical Institute in Sinop, a suburb of Sukhumi. Volmer went to the Nauchno-Issledovatel’skij Institut-9 (NII-9, Scientific Research Institute No. 9), Today, NII-9 is the Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Bochvar VNIINM. See Oleynikov, 2000, 4. in Moscow; he was given a design bureau to work on the production of heavy water. In Institute A, Thiessen became leader for developing techniques for manufacturing porous barriers for isotope separation. * Meliton Kantaria (1920–1993) sergeant of the Red Army who raised the Soviet victory banner over the Reichstag in Berlin, April 30, 1945 * Geno Adamia (1936–1993) Georgian major general and garrison commander of Sukhumi. Executed with the entire garrison and extermination of the city's population by Abkhazian militia during the Sukhumi massacre. * John Shalikashvili (Poland, 1936–2011) general of the United States, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and supreme commander of NATO forces in Europe. Partially solved Kurdish conflict on the Iraqi-Turkish border saving around 500.000 Kurdish people being displaced. Developed the Joint Vision 10 plan, a template which combined all elements of the United States armed forces to one efficient network of the different combat components. - SSSR-65893 (Transair Georgian Airline Shootdowns (September 1993)) Sukhumi September 21, 1993 Tupolev TU-134 (TU-134) Shot down by the Abkhaz forces in the course of war - - SSSR-85163 (Transair Georgian Airline Shootdowns (September 1993)) Sukhumi September 22, 1993 Tupolev TU-154 Shot down by the Abkhaz forces in the course of war - - SSSR-65001 (Transair Georgian Airline Shootdowns (September 1993)) Sukhumi September 23, 1993 Tupolev TU-154 Shot down by the Abkhaz forces in the course of war - WikiPedia:Sukhumi Commons:Category:Sukhumi


Bristol

from about 1850 to 1880 a related style known as Bristol Byzantine was popular for industrial buildings which combined elements of the Byzantine style with Moorish architecture. It was developed on a wide-scale basis in Russia during the reign of Alexander II (Alexander II of Russia) by Grigory Gagarin and his followers who designed St Volodymyr's Cathedral in Kiev, St Nicholas Naval Cathedral (:Image:Kronstadt Naval Cathedral 1.jpg) in Kronstadt, Alexander Nevsky Cathedral in Sofia, Saint Mark's church (St. Mark's Church, Belgrade) in Belgrade and the New Athos Monastery in New Athos near Sukhumi. The largest Neo-Byzantine project of the 20th century was the Temple of Saint Sava in Belgrade. In March 2012 a new production directed by Laurence Connor began a UK national tour to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the show, beginning at the Theatre Royal Plymouth and traveling to Manchester, Bristol, Dublin, Leeds, Edinburgh, Milton Keynes, Cardiff and Southampton. John Owen-Jones and Earl Carpenter alternate as the Phantom with Katie Hall as Christine and Simon Bailey as Raoul. http: www.thephantomoftheoperatour.com Walter was born in Kansas City (Kansas City, Missouri), Missouri, in 1910. His ancestry was German British on his father's side, and American British on his mother's side. He was brought to England in 1915, and educated at Westminster School and afterwards in King's College (King's College, Cambridge), Cambridge, in 1931. He failed to obtain a research fellowship in Cambridge and so turned to doing basic and applied neurophysiological research in hospitals, in London, from 1935 to 1939 and then at the Burden Neurological Institute in Bristol, from 1939 to 1970. He also carried out research work in the United States, in the Soviet Union and in various other places in Europe. He married twice, and had two sons from his first marriage and one from the second. According to his eldest son, Nicolas Walter, "he was politically on the left, a communist fellow-traveller before the Second World War and an anarchist sympathiser after it." Throughout his life he was a pioneer in the field of cybernetics. In 1970 he suffered brain injury in a motor scooter accident. He died seven years later on May 6, 1977 without fully recovering. In the 1930s Walter made a number of discoveries using his EEG (Electroencephalography) machines at Burden Neurological Institute in Bristol. He was the first to determine by triangulation the surface location of the strongest alpha waves within the occipital lobe (alpha waves originate from the thalamus (human thalamus) deep within the brain). Walter demonstrated the use of delta waves to locate brain tumours or lesions responsible for epilepsy. He developed the first brain topography machine (EEG topography) based on EEG (Electroencephalography), using on an array of spiral-scan CRT (cathode ray tube)s connected to high-gain amplifiers. There are no cities on the English coast but the resorts of Burnham-on-Sea, Watchet, Minehead and Ilfracombe face directly onto the Bristol Channel, whilst Barnstaple and Bideford are sited on estuaries opening onto Bideford Bay at the westernmost end of the Bristol Channel. The city of Bristol, originally established on the River Avon (River Avon, Bristol) but now with docks (Avonmouth Docks) on the Severn estuary, is one of the most important ports (Port of Bristol) in Britain and gives its name to the Channel which forms its seaward approach. Paddle steamers P and A Campbell of Bristol were the main operators of pleasure craft, particularly paddle steamers, from the mid-19th century to the late 1970s, together with the Barry Railway Company. These served harbours along both coasts, such as Ilfracombe and Weston-super-Mare. Biography But in 1538 a John Hooper appears among the names of the Black Friars (Dominican Order) at Gloucester and also among the White Friars (Carmelite) at Bristol who surrendered their houses to the king. A John Hooper was likewise canon (canon (priest)) of Wormesley Priory in Herefordshire; but identification of any of these with the future bishop is doubtful. Rather, he appears to have been in 1538 rector of Liddington, Wiltshire, a benefice in Sir Thomas Arundell (Thomas Arundell of Lanherne)'s gift, though he must have been a non-resident incumbent. ''The Greyfriars' Chronicle (Greyfriars)'' says that Hooper was "sometime a white monk (Cistercian)"; and in the sentence pronounced against him by Stephen Gardiner he is described as "olim monachus de Cliva Ordinis Cisterciensis," i.e. of the Cistercian house of Cleeve Abbey in Somerset. On the other hand, he was not accused, like other married bishops who had been monks or friars, of infidelity to the vow of chastity; and his own letters to Heinrich Bullinger are curiously reticent on this part of his history. He speaks of himself as being the only son and heir of his father and as fearing to be deprived of his inheritance if he adopted the reformed religion. - FZO EGTG Bristol Filton Airport Filton, Bristol, United Kingdom A number of food manufacture companies have existed in Paisley. The preserve manufacturer Robertsons (James Robertson (grocer)) which was founded in Paisley in the 1860s was taken over by Rank Hovis McDougall who closed its Stevenson Street factory and transferred production to Bristol, Manchester and London in the 1970s. Brown & Polson commenced producing starch and cornflour (cornstarch) in Paisley in the 1860s. It later became CPC Foods Ltd, a subsidiary of Unilever, which produced Hellmann's (Hellmann's and Best Foods) mayonnaise, Gerber (Gerber Products Company) baby foods and Knorr (Knorr (brand)) soups. The company ceased production in Paisley in 2002. Commons:Category:Bristol Dmoz:Regional Europe United Kingdom England Bristol Wikipedia:Bristol


Russia

birth to local schools of architecture. Commons:Category:Russia WikiPedia:Russia Dmoz:Regional Europe Russia


Canada

got Air Florida 16 percent of the California-based company. thumb Mark di Suvero (Image:Aurora Mark di Suvero.jpg), ''Aurora,'' 1992-1993 Canadian (Canada) painter Jean-Paul Riopelle (1923–2002) who was a member of the Montreal-based, surrealist-inspired group Les Automatistes helped introduce a related style that some might problematically call


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