Places Known For

related concept


Zaire

, singing the catchy phrase ''¡Esto sí es volar!'' (''This really is flying!''). A related concept later developed in Mobutu's Zaire is that of ''authenticité (Authenticité (Zaire))'' or Authenticity. The diamond was discovered in the Mbuji-Mayi district of Zaire (Democratic Republic of the Congo) in 1990 in alluvial deposits; uncut, it was 777 carats (155.4 g). It was purchased by De Beers during the height of the country's Civil War that took place in the early


Afghanistan

, some imaginative geographies may be uncritically accepted, making them highly infectious and easily communicable among individuals subjected to them, which draws parallels to symbolic violence. Third, he argues that the etymology of the Latin word for ‘virulence’ (virulentus) is derived from the word man (vir), and as related concept metaphors in contemporary English, ‘virulence’ and ‘virility’ are informed by masculinist modes of response and engagement. Virulent imaginative geographies are thus argued to employ a sense of ‘virility’ to code ‘Oriental’ males as pre-oedipal and or feminine. Springer also contends that the first step towards peace involves rethinking our imaginative geographies. More recent examples of collaboration, according to some, have included institutions and individuals in Afghanistan who collaborated with the Soviet occupation (Soviet occupation of Afghanistan) until 1989 and individuals in Iraq and Afghanistan today who continue to work with American forces. Since the overthrow of Communism in 1989, other Muslim immigrants have come to Poland. A relatively prominent group are Turks and Muslims from the former Yugoslavia. There are also smaller groups of immigrants from Pakistan, Afghanistan, and from other countries, as well as a small refugee community coming from Chechnya. '''South Waziristan''' ( Commons:Category:Afghanistan WikiPedia:Afghanistan Dmoz:Regional Asia Afghanistan


Iraq

geographies may be uncritically accepted, making them highly infectious and easily communicable among individuals subjected to them, which draws parallels to symbolic violence. Third, he argues that the etymology of the Latin word for ‘virulence’ (virulentus) is derived from the word man (vir), and as related concept metaphors in contemporary English, ‘virulence’ and ‘virility’ are informed by masculinist modes of response and engagement. Virulent imaginative geographies are thus argued to employ a sense of ‘virility’ to code ‘Oriental’ males as pre-oedipal and or feminine. Springer also contends that the first step towards peace involves rethinking our imaginative geographies. The '''2006 al-Askari Mosque bombing''' occurred at the '''al-Askari Mosque''' in the Iraqi city of Samarra, on February 22, 2006, at about 6:55 a.m. local time (0355 UTC (Coordinated Universal Time)). The attack on the mosque, one of the holiest sites in Shia Islam, is believed to have been caused by Al-Qaeda in Iraq. Although no injuries occurred in the blasts, the mosque was severely damaged. After the Black September operations, Oudeh resumed his activity in Fatah and the PLO in close collaboration with Abu Iyad and other officials. He led armed units in Lebanon during the Lebanese Civil War. In January 1977, Oudeh was intercepted by French police in Paris while travelling from Beirut under an assumed name. Commons:Category:Iraq WikiPedia:Iraq Dmoz:Regional Middle East Iraq


Egypt

'''2'''–0 2–0 2006 Africa Cup of Nations - * '''NHS situation''': The case was "very important for the medical profession". Devlin, p. 35. The NHS (National Health Service) had been founded in 1948 but by 1956 was stretched financially to breaking point and doctors were disaffected. Indeed, a Royal Commission was set up in February 1957 to consider doctors' pay. A doctor sentenced to death would have led to "mass defections" from the service for fear of being hanged (hanging) for simply prescribing medication. Moreover, it would have shaken public confidence in the service and in the government of the time as well. * '''The Suez Crisis''': On 26 July 1956 President Nasser (Gamal Abdel Nasser) of Egypt announced the nationalisation of the Suez Canal. This was opposed by Britain and France and an ultimatum was issued on 30 October. Bombardment began the next day. On 5 November, Britain and France invaded. Political and financial pressure from the US and NATO led to a withdrawal by 24 December. In January 1957 Prime Minister Anthony Eden resigned and was succeeded by Harold Macmillan. The situation was such that when Harold Macmillan became Prime Minister on 10 January 1957, he told the Queen (Queen Elizabeth II) he could not guarantee his government would last "six weeks". Macmillan, Harold. ''The Macmillan Diaries, The Cabinet Years, 1950–1957'', ed. Peter Catterall (London, Macmillan, 2003). Adams' fate was therefore entwined with that of the reeling government. * '''Harold Macmillan link''': On 26 November 1950 the 10th Duke of Devonshire (Edward Cavendish, 10th Duke of Devonshire) had a heart attack. Adams tended him and was by his side


Poland

individuals subjected to them, which draws parallels to symbolic violence. Third, he argues that the etymology of the Latin word for ‘virulence’ (virulentus) is derived from the word man (vir), and as related concept metaphors in contemporary English, ‘virulence’ and ‘virility’ are informed by masculinist modes of response and engagement. Virulent imaginative geographies are thus argued to employ a sense of ‘virility’ to code ‘Oriental’ males as pre-oedipal and or feminine. Springer also contends that the first step towards peace involves rethinking our imaginative geographies. 282 px (File:JanLam.jpg) '''Jan Lam''' (1838 - 1886) was a Polish (Poland) journalist, writer and comic, as well as a teacher in numerous schools of Galicia. He is probably best remembered as the author of a poem ''Marsz Sokołów'', the anthem of the Sokół, as well as a long-time journalist of the Dziennik Polski daily. Towards the end of World War II, two subcamps of Dachau concentration camp — one for men, one for women — were established in Burgau. More than 1000 prisoners, including 500 Jewish women and girls from Poland and Hungary, were transported form Dachau, Bergen-Belsen (Bergen-Belsen concentration camp) and Ravensbrück (Ravensbrück concentration camp). They forced to work (forced labour in Germany during World War II) in miserable conditions in an aircraft hangar in Scheppach Forest (Jettingen-Scheppach); 18 died and were buried in the Jewish cemetery in Ichenhausen. ''Gedenkstätten für die Opfer des Nationalsozialismus. Eine Dokumentation, Band 1. Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung, Bonn 1995, ISBN 3-89331-208-0, S. 149 After the war, some 1600 ''Heimatvertriebene'' were resettled in Burgau. During World War II, '''ghettos in Nazi (Nazism)-occupied Europe''' were set up by the Third Reich in order to confine Jews and sometimes Gypsies (Romani people) into tightly packed areas of the cities. In total, according to USHMM archives, "The Germans established at least 1,000 ghettos in German-occupied and annexed Poland and the Soviet Union alone." Therefore, the examples are intended only to illustrate their scope and living conditions across Eastern Europe. Types of Ghettos. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, D.C. Although the common usage in Holocaust literature is 'ghetto', the Nazis most often referred to these detention facilities in documents and signage as 'Jüdischer Wohnbezirk' or 'Wohngebiet der Juden' (German); both translate as Jewish Quarter (Jewish Quarter (diaspora)). World War II In 1937 Kook began his career as an international spokesperson for the Irgun and Revisionist Zionism. He first went to Poland, where he was involved in fundraising and establishing Irgun cells in Eastern Europe. It was there that he met the founder of the Revisionist movement, Ze'ev Jabotinsky, and became friends with his son Ari (Ari Jabotinsky). At the founders' request, Kook traveled to the United States with Jabotinsky in 1940, at United States Holocaust Memorial Museum where he soon served as the head of the Irgun and revisionist mission in America, following the elder's death in August. This assignment was clandestine, and Kook publicly denied he was affiliated with the Irgun many times while in America. In 1943, Kook established an "Emergency Committee for the Rescue of European Jewry". The Committee, which included Jewish and non-Jewish American writers, public figures, and politicians, worked to disseminate information to the general public, and also lobbied the President (President of the United States) and Congress (Congress of the United States) to take immediate action to save the remnants of Europe's Jews. United States immigration laws at the time limited immigration to only 2% of the number of each nationality present in the United States since the census of 1890, which limited Jews from Austria and Germany to 27,370 and from Poland to 6,542; even these quotas often went unfilled, due to United States State Department pressure on US consulates to place as many obstacles as possible in the path of refugees. The proposal to admit more refugees was ratified by the United States Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, and, in response to the pressure, President Roosevelt (Franklin D. Roosevelt) subsequently issued an administrative order for the establishment of a special national authority, the War Refugee Board (WRB) to deal with Jewish and non-Jewish war refugees. An official government emissary sent to Turkey was of considerable assistance in the rescue of Romanian Jewry. The WRB saved about 200,000 Jews. (Wyman 1984:285) Those rescued through the WRB were probably mostly in Hungary, in part through the Raoul Wallenberg mission which was sponsored by the WRB. '''Barbara Jagiellon''' (15 July 1478 – 15 February 1534 POLAND, Medieval Lands ) was a princess of Poland and a duchess of Saxony (Duchy of Saxony). Life Barbara was married on 21 November 1496 in a glittering ceremony in Leipzig to George, Duke of Saxony (1471–1539). At the wedding, 6,286 German and Polish nobles were said to be present. This marriage was a key part of maintaining good diplomatic relations between Germany and Poland. For Barbara's family, the marriage was also important due to their rivalry with the House of Habsburg. Both states joined the League of Nations, and both signed agreements of defence of several countries, most significantly Poland. The Treaty of Sèvres split the Middle East between the two states, in the form of mandates (League of Nations mandate). However the outlook of the nations were different during the inter-war years; while France saw itself inherently as a European power, the UK enjoyed close relationships with Australia, Canada and New Zealand and at one time flirted with the idea of Empire Free Trade, a form of protectionism that would have seen large tariffs placed on goods from France. WikiPedia:Poland Commons:Category:Poland Dmoz:Regional Europe Poland


Italy

) was interested in the idea and later often said that "We can live without oil, but not without water." Hutchinson, p. 158 When the device proved not to work as expected, the team started work on a related concept, a "water sniffer"; if they couldn't make clean water, perhaps they could find it. * 1915 - The first sustained aerial bombing offensive is made by Italian (Italy) Caproni Ca.2s against Austria-Hungary. In 1652


France

", though the Laplace plane more often refers to the related concept of the plane about which orbital planes (Orbital plane (astronomy)) precess (Precession of the ecliptic). The two should not be confused, though both derive from the work of (and are at least sometimes named for) the French (France) astronomer Pierre Simon Laplace. La Place, Marquis de (Pierre Simon Laplace). ''Mécanique Céleste'', translated by Nathaniel Bowditch. Boston: 1829, in four volumes (1829–1839). See volume I, chapter V, especially page 121. Originally published as ''Traite de mécanique céleste'' (''Treatise on Celestial Mechanics'') in five volumes, 1799–1825. The two are equivalent only in the case where all perturbers (Perturbation theory) and resonances (Orbital resonance) are far from the precessing body. The invariable plane is simply derived from the sum of angular momenta, and is "invariable" over the entire system, while the Laplace plane may be different for different orbiting objects within a system. Laplace called the invariable plane the ''plane of maximum areas'', where the area is the product of the radius and its differential time change dR dt, that is, its velocity, multiplied by the mass. thumb 220px Charles, comte Lefebvre-Desnouettes. (Image:Lefebvre Desnouettes.jpg) '''Charles, comte Lefebvre-Desnouettes''' or '''Lefèbvre-Desnoëttes''' (1773 – 22 May 1822) became a French (France) officer during the French Revolutionary Wars and a general during the Napoleonic Wars. He later emigrated to the United States. Commons:Category:France WikiPedia:France Dmoz:Regional Europe France


United States

, for the ability to convict is reserved to the jury. In a civil action, a related concept to the directed verdict is that of a non-suit. A judge may decide to direct a verdict of not guilty if there is not a ''scintilla of evidence'' to prove a guilty verdict. An American (United States) adaptation entitled ''Billy (Billy (1979 TV series))'' and starring Steve Guttenberg, Peggy Pope, and James Gallery aired briefly on CBS in 1979. '''Frontier Airlines


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