Places Known For

prolific writing


Second Polish Republic

a promising start, he became despondent and felt for some years "Lost in America" (title of a Singer novel, in Yiddish from 1974 onward, in English 1981). In 1938, he met Alma Wassermann (born Haimann) b.1907-d.1996 , a German-Jewish refugee from Munich whom he married in 1940. After the marriage he returned to prolific writing and to contributing to the ''Forward,'' using, besides "Bashevis," the pen names "Varshavsky" and "D. Segal." See: Both bibliographies (given on this page). They lived for many years in the Belnord on Manhattan's Upper West Side. Belnord," Carter B. Horsley. In 1981, Singer delivered a commencement address at the University at Albany, and was presented with an honorary doctorate. University at Albany's 137th Annual Commencement, May 24, 1981 *1918 – World War I: the Second Battle of the Marne begins near the River Marne with a German (Germany) attack. *1920 – The Polish (Second Polish Republic) Parliament establishes Silesian Voivodeship (Silesian Voivodeship (1920–1939)) before the Polish-German plebiscite (Upper Silesia plebiscite). *1927 – Massacre of July 15, 1927 (July Revolt of 1927): 89 protesters are killed by the Austrian police in Vienna. The city has grown from a Stone Age settlement to Poland's second most important city. It began as a hamlet on Wawel Hill and was already being reported as a busy trading centre of Slavonic (Slavic peoples) Europe in 965. With the establishment of new universities and cultural venues at the emergence of the Second Polish Republic and throughout the 20th century, Kraków reaffirmed its role as a major national academic and artistic centre. The city has a population of approximately 760,000 whereas about 8 million people live within a 100 km radius of its main square (Main Market Square, Kraków). With the emergence of the Second Polish Republic, Kraków restored its role as a major academic and cultural centre with the establishment of new universities such as the AGH University of Science and Technology and the Jan Matejko Academy of Fine Arts, including a number of new and essential vocational schools. It became an important cultural centre for the Polish Jews (History of the Jews in Poland) with a Zionist (Zionism) youth movement relatively strong among the city's Jewish population. Kraków was also an influential centre of Jewish spiritual life, with all its manifestations of religious observance from Orthodox (Orthodox Judaism), to Chasidic (Hasidic Judaism) and Reform (Reform Judaism) flourishing side by side. left thumb The funeral procession of head of state Marshal of Poland Marshal (File:Pilsudskis funeral in Cracow2.jpg) Józef Piłsudski at the Wawel, 1935. Administrative history of Kashubia The westernmost (Slovincian) parts of Kashubia, located in the medieval Lands of Schlawe and Stolp and Lauenburg and Bütow Land, were integrated into the Duchy of Pomerania in 1317 and 1455, respectively, and remained with its successors (Brandenburgian Pomerania (Province of Pomerania (1653-1815)) and Prussian Pomerania (Province of Pomerania (1815–1945))) until 1945 (Potsdam Agreement), when the area became Polish (Oder-Neisse line). The bulk of Kashubia since the 12th century was within the medieval Pomerelian duchies, since 1308 (Teutonic takeover of Danzig) in the Monastic state of the Teutonic Knights, since 1466 (Second Peace of Thorn) within Royal Prussia, an autonomous territory of the Polish Crown, since 1772 (Partitions of Poland) within West Prussia, a Prussian province, since 1920 (Treaty of Versailes) within the Polish Corridor of the Second Polish Republic, since 1939 (Invasion of Poland (1939)) within the Reichsgau Danzig-West Prussia of Nazi Germany, and since 1945 (Potsdam Agreement) within the People's Republic of Poland, and after within the Third Polish Republic. right thumb Dark green: original signatories Green: subsequent adherents Light blue: territories of parties Dark blue: League of Nations mandate (File:Kellogg Briand Pact countries.png)s administered by parties After negotiations, the pact was signed in Paris at the French Foreign Ministry (Minister of Foreign Affairs (France)) by the representatives from Australia, Belgium, Canada, Czechoslovakia (Czechoslovak Republic (1918–1938)), France, Germany, British India, the Irish Free State, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Poland (Second Polish Republic), South Africa (Union of South Africa), the United Kingdom DATE OF BIRTH August 13, 1929 PLACE OF BIRTH Równe (Rivne), Poland (Second Polish Republic) (now Rivne, Ukraine) DATE OF DEATH April 10, 2010


United States

'' ( ), a Yiddish-language newspaper. After a promising start, he became despondent and felt for some years "Lost in America" (title of a Singer novel, in Yiddish from 1974 onward, in English 1981). In 1938, he met Alma Wassermann (born Haimann) b.1907-d.1996 , a German-Jewish refugee from Munich whom he married in 1940. After the marriage he returned to prolific writing and to contributing to the ''Forward,'' using, besides "Bashevis," the pen names

) '''Robert Edwin Lee''' (October 15, 1918 – July 8, 1994) was an American (United States) playwright and lyricist. With his writing partner, Jerome Lawrence, Lee worked for Armed Forces Radio during World War II; Lawrence and Lee became the most prolific writing partnership in radio, with such long-running series as ''Favorite Story'' among others. Carranza maintained Mexican neutrality throughout World War I. He briefly considered allying with the German Empire after

and culture, through his editorship of the Boston (Boston, Massachusetts) newspaper ''The Pilot (The Pilot (newspaper))'', his prolific writing, and his lecture tours. Brazil officially opened the Resende (Resende, Rio de Janeiro) enrichment plant in May 2006. BBC News: Brazil joins world's nuclear club BBC News. Retrieved on 2010-10-06. Brazil's enrichment technology development, and the plant itself, involved


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