Places Known For

poem published


Lviv

died March 20, 1923 in Lviv and was buried at the Yaniv Cemetery. Life Makuszyński attended the Jan Długosz gymnasium in Lviv (Polish: ''Lwów''). While in school he wrote occasional poetry (he started writing at the age of 14), and had his first poem published in 1902 in the newspaper ''Słowo Polskie'' (''Polish Word''), for which he soon became a theatrical critic. ref name "Piasecka


Kingdom of Prussia

;query.nytimes.com" the son of Christiane Weitling and Guilliaume Terigeon, the latter a French soldier in Napoleon's army who died in Russia in 1812. His parent were not married. A tailor's apprentice, Weitling began to travel as a journeyman tailor in 1830, when he joined the clothing firm of Höpfner & Walseck in Leipzig. There he first displayed his talent as an activist with a satirical poem published locally. In 1832, he went to Dresden, and later Vienna. ), located in the Tiergarten in Berlin, is a prominent memorial statue dedicated to Prince Otto von Bismarck, Prime Minister (Prime Minister of Prussia) of the Kingdom of Prussia and the first Chancellor (Chancellor of Germany (German Reich)) of the German Empire. It was sculpted by Reinhold Begas. History The town is first mentioned in 1399. During the 14th and 15th century, it prospered along the trade route between Danzig and Russia (Russian Empire). By 1790, there was a gristing mill, sawmill, brewery, and inn. Under the Second Partition of Poland in 1793, the settlement was annexed by Prussia (Kingdom of Prussia). It returned to Congress Poland following the Congress of Vienna in 1815. On September 2, 1846, the town was first connected to the emerging Polish railways as part of the mainline between Warsaw and Kraków. Following the development of Łódź as an industrial center, Koluszki served as the junction for its rail. By 1900, about half of the town worked for the railway in some capacity and the town developed around the railway and bus stations. The town suffered during both world wars. Under the Nazi occupation (Nazi occupation of Poland) during the Second World War, Koluszki was annexed to Germany (Nazi Germany) and was the site of a Jewish ghetto. The town was restored to Poland by the Red Army on January 18, 1945. Its town charter was established in 1949. Klein dealt with small matters of zoological nomenclature and set up his own system of classification of animals, which was based on the number, shape, and position of the limbs. For his work in the field of natural science, Klein had been awarded the membership of several scientific societies, including the Royal Society in London and the Danzig Research Society. He was also a correspondent of the Lutheran pastor Friedrich Christian Lesser. He died 27 February 1759 in Königsberg, Prussia (Kingdom of Prussia) (now Kaliningrad, Russia). The settlement in the historical region of Upper Lusatia was first mentioned in a 1262 deed. Initially a possession of the Bohemian crown (Kingdom of Bohemia), Lusatia by the 1635 Peace of Prague (Peace of Prague (1635)) fell to the Saxon Electorate (Electorate of Saxony). As Saxony had sided with Napoleon (Napoleon I of France) it had to cede the northeastern part of Upper Lusatia to Prussia (Kingdom of Prussia) according to the Final Act of the 1815 Vienna Congress (Congress of Vienna). After the new border had been drawn, ''Reichenau'' was the only locality east of the Neisse river (Lusatian Neisse) that belonged to the Kingdom of Saxony. With the implementation of the Oder-Neisse line at the end of World War II, it was therefore the only municipality in Poland which until 1945 was part of the Free State of Saxony (Saxony). At first called ''Rychwald'', the town was renamed in 1947. thumb left Tower of the Upper Gate (File:Bad Ziegenhals-turm.JPG) After the First Silesian War (Silesian Wars) and the 1742 Treaty of Breslau the Duchy of Nysa was partitioned and Ziegenhals became a Prussian (Kingdom of Prussia) bordertown, while the adjacent area around Zlaté Hory remained with Austrian Silesia. In the 19th century it became a spa town (''Bad''). After World War II and the implementation of the Oder-Neisse line in 1945, the area fell to the Republic of Poland (People's Republic of Poland). First documented in the 13th century, Berlin became the capital of the Kingdom of Prussia (w:Kingdom of Prussia) (1701–1918), the German Empire (w:German Empire) (1871–1918), the Weimar Republic (w:Weimar Republic) (1919–33) and the Third Reich (w:Third Reich) (1933–45). Berlin in the 1920s (w:1920s Berlin) was the third largest municipality in the world. After World War II, the city, along with the German state, was divided - into East Berlin (w:East Berlin) — capital of the German Democratic Republic (w:German Democratic Republic), colloquially identified in English as East Germany — and West Berlin (w:West Berlin), a political exclave (w:exclave) (surrounded by the Berlin Wall (w:Berlin Wall) from 1961 to 1989) and a ''de facto'' (although not ''de jure'' (w:Allied Control Council)) state of the Federal Republic of Germany (w:Federal Republic of Germany), known colloquially in English as West Germany (w:West Germany) from 1949 to 1990. Following German reunification (w:German reunification) in 1990, the city was once more designated as the capital of all Germany.


Malta

in Malta, the Middle East and India, with the earliest recorded printed use being in a poem published in the journal ''Aeroplane'', in Malta on April 10, 1929. "Entry for 'Gremlin'." ''Online Etymology Dictionary.'' Retrieved: October 12, 2010. ''Word Histories and Mysteries: From Abracadabra to Zeus.'' Lewisville, Texas: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2004. ISBN 978-0-618-45450-1. Later sources have sometimes claimed that the concept goes back to World War I, but there is no print evidence of this.


Kiev

(Polish: ''Lwów''). While in school he wrote occasional poetry (he started writing at the age of 14), and had his first poem published in 1902 in the newspaper ''Słowo Polskie'' (''Polish Word''), for which he soon became a theatrical critic. He studied language and literature at both the University of Lviv (then Jan Kazimierz University


Romania

have appeared in major literary journals, papers, and magazines in the Philippines and in anthologies published in the United States, Japan, the Netherlands, China, Romania, Hong Kong, Germany and Malaysia. These include: excerpts from ''Sunlight on Broken Stones'', published in ''World Literature Today'', USA, Spring 2000; ''What Rizal Told Me'' (poem), published in ''Manoa'', University of Hawaii, 1997; ''She of the Quick Hands: My Daughter


Greece

he would later praise in his work ''Vers une architecture (Toward an Architecture)'' (1923) ("Towards an Architecture," but usually translated into English (English language) as "Towards a new Architecture"). In 1940, Dunsany was appointed Byron Professor of English in Athens University, Greece but had to be evacuated due to wartime disruptions, returning home by a circuitous route, his travels forming a basis for a long poem published in book form. Olivia


Soviet Union

. Communist writer After the August 1944 Coup (King Michael Coup) against the pro-Axis (Axis powers) Antonescu and the start of Soviet occupation (Soviet occupation of Romania), Colin became a noted supporter of left-wing causes. That year, at the age of twenty-three, he also graduated from Bucharest's Cantemir Vodă High School and had his first poem published in ''Victoria'' journal. Alexandra Andrei


India

, the Middle East and India, with the earliest recorded printed use being in a poem published in the journal ''Aeroplane'', in Malta on April 10, 1929. "Entry for 'Gremlin'." ''Online Etymology Dictionary.'' Retrieved: October 12, 2010. ''Word Histories and Mysteries: From Abracadabra to Zeus.'' Lewisville, Texas: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2004. ISBN 978-0-618-45450-1. Later sources have sometimes claimed that the concept goes back to World War I, but there is no print evidence of this. Commons:Category:India Wikipedia:India Dmoz:Regional Asia India


Japan

is also a model, under the stage name Mika Kawai. His poems have appeared in major literary journals, papers, and magazines in the Philippines and in anthologies published in the United States, Japan, the Netherlands, China, Romania, Hong Kong, Germany and Malaysia. These include: excerpts from ''Sunlight on Broken Stones'', published in ''World Literature Today'', USA, Spring 2000; ''What Rizal Told Me'' (poem), published in ''Manoa'', University


Canada

May 1915 after witnessing the death of his friend (a fellow soldier) the day before. The poem was first published on 8 December 1915 in the London-based magazine ''Punch (Punch (magazine))''. In 1918, American (United States) YWCA (YWCA USA) worker Moina Michael, inspired by the poem, published a poem of her own called "We Shall Keep the Faith".


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017