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personal voice


Prague

on fundamental questions such as national sovereignty, socialist democracy, and the freedom of culture. In conversation with the neo-romantics, the next generation of authors leaned toward realism and naturalism (naturalism (literature)), the ordinary and banal. They favored contemporary subjects over historical ones, and sought to deemphasize the personal voice of the author in comparison to the often highly colored speech of the characters. Two main topics were of interest: the exploration of the Czech village and the extent to which it remained an oasis of good morals (Jan Herben, Karel Václav Rais, Alois Mrštík); and Prague, especially the life of the lower classes (Ignát Herrman, Karel Matěj Čapek Chod). thumb Autograph of Jaroslav Foglar (1983) (File:Jaroslav Foglar autograph.jpg) '''Jaroslav Foglar''' (6 July 1907 in Prague - 23 January 1999) was a famous Czech (Czech language) author who wrote many novels about youths (partly also about Boy Scouts (Junák) movement) and their adventures in nature and dark city streets. Early life Foglar was born and grew up in Prague, capital of Bohemia. Because his father died prematurely he was brought up in rather poor material conditions by his mother. He was strongly influenced by romantic parts of Prague. All of the fictional towns in his novels are more or less derived from Prague. During the 1920s, Foglar was strongly influenced by German independent Wandervogel movement as well as Scout (Scouting) movement led by Antonín Benjamin Svojsík under Czech (Czechs) name Junák. Early life Foglar was born and grew up in Prague, capital of Bohemia. Because his father died prematurely he was brought up in rather poor material conditions by his mother. He was strongly influenced by romantic parts of Prague. All of the fictional towns in his novels are more or less derived from Prague. During the 1920s, Foglar was strongly influenced by German independent Wandervogel movement as well as Scout (Scouting) movement led by Antonín Benjamin Svojsík under Czech (Czechs) name Junák. Early life Foglar was born and grew up in Prague, capital of Bohemia. Because his father died prematurely he was brought up in rather poor material conditions by his mother. He was strongly influenced by romantic parts of Prague. All of the fictional towns in his novels are more or less derived from Prague. During the 1920s, Foglar was strongly influenced by German independent Wandervogel movement as well as Scout (Scouting) movement led by Antonín Benjamin Svojsík under Czech (Czechs) name Junák. Writer and editor career, prohibited writer and the end of life During 1930s and 1940s, Foglar worked as a magazine editor in one of the largest Prague publishing houses, Melantrich. He edited several journals for youths: * ''Mladý hlasatel'' ("Young herald"), 1938–1941 In 1490 he once again went through Breslau (Wrocław) to Prague, capital of the Kingdom of Bohemia. Hartmann Schedel used Celtis' descriptions of Breslau in the ''Schedelsche Weltchronik'' (Nuremberg Chronicle). In Hungary, Celtis formed the ''Sodalitas Litterarum Hungaria'' ("Hungarian Literary Society"), later as ''Sodalitas Litterarum Danubiana'' to be based in Vienna. He made stops at Regensburg, Passau and Nuremberg (and probably Mainz). At Heidelberg he founded the ''Sodalitas Litterarum Rhenana'' ("Rhineland Literary Society"). Later he went to Lübeck and Ingolstadt. At Ingolstadt, in 1492 he delivered his famous speech to the students there, in which he called on Germans to rival Italians in learning and letters. This would later become an extremely popular address in sixteenth century German nationalistic sentiment. A first "international" competition for football clubs was founded in 1897 in Vienna. The "'''Challenge Cup'''" was invented by John Gramlick Sr., a co-founder of the Vienna Cricket and Football Club. In this cup competition all clubs of the Austro-Hungarian Empire (Austria-Hungary) that normally would not meet could take part, though actually almost only clubs from the Empire's three major cities Vienna, Budapest and Prague participated. The Challenge Cup was carried out until the year 1911 and is today seen as the predecessor to the Mitropa Cup and consequently the European Cup and Champions League (UEFA Champions League). The last winner of the cup was Vienna Sports Club, one of the oldest and most traditional football clubs of Austria where the cup still remains. Like many settlements, Marburg developed at the crossroads of two important early medieval highways: the trade route linking Cologne and Prague and the trade route from the North Sea to the Alps and on to Italy, the former crossing the river Lahn here. The settlement was protected and customs were raised by a small castle built during the 9th or 10th century by the Giso. Marburg has been a town since 1140, as proven by coins. From the Gisos, it fell around that time to the Landgraves (Graf) of Thuringia, residing on the Wartburg above Eisenach. In 1741, the Austrian authorities informed Maria Theresa that Bohemian populace would prefer Charles Albert to her as sovereign. Maria Theresa, desperate and burdened by pregnancy, wrote plaintively to her sister: "I don't know if a town will remain to me for my delivery." Browning, 65. She bitterly vowed to spare nothing and no one to defend her kingdom when she wrote to the Bohemian chancellor, Count Philip Kinsky (Philip Kinsky): "My mind is made up. We must put everything at stake to save Bohemia." Duffy, 151. She explained her resolution to the Count furthermore: "I shall have all my armies, all my Hungarians killed off before I cede so much as an inch of ground." Browning, 76. On 26 October, the Elector of Bavaria captured Prague and declared himself King of Bohemia. Maria Theresa, then in Hungary, wept on learning of the loss of Bohemia. Browning, 79. Charles Albert was unanimously elected Holy Roman Emperor on 24 January 1742. The Archduchess, who regarded the election as a catastrophe, Browning, 88. caught her enemies unprepared by insisting on a winter campaign; Browning, 92. the same day he was elected emperor, Austrian troops under Ludwig Andreas von Khevenhüller captured Munich, Charles Albert's capital. Crankshaw, 93. Dmoz:Regional Europe Czech Republic Regions Prague Commons:Category:Prague Wikipedia:Prague


Berlin

. Although in the early sixties Goehr was considered a leader of the avant-garde, his oblique attitude to modernism — and to any movement or school whatsoever — soon became evident. In a sequence of works including the Piano Trio (1966), the opera ''Arden Must Die'' (1966), the music-theatre piece ''Triptych'' (1968–70), the orchestral ''Metamorphosis Dance'' (1974), and the String Quartet No. 3 (1975–76), Goehr's personal voice was revealed, arising from a highly individual use of the serial


Washington, D.C.

;Dorff2002" Walter Kerr of ''The New York Times'' even faulted the play for "the fact that Mr. Williams's personal voice is nowhere to be heard." In addition to receiving poor critical notices, the play opened at the same time that New Yorkers were dealing with a heavy blizzard and a transit strike, and subsequently closed after fourteen performances. As a result of the play's critical failure, Williams


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