Places Known For

people giving


Tonga

names appearing on nautical maps and perhaps various other maps, people giving it another name and or nickname to it, visually marking the presence of this particular island with a buoy as it seems to pose a significant isolated danger to passing vessels in nearby busy marine traffic areas, an important marine ecosystem existing on and or around it, & etc. then such federally-designated islands as these must be of some significance, because the federal government, various government agencies

of such islands as these using tax-payer money, the man hours it took to record these into government datatbases, such islands as these with their designated names appearing on nautical maps and perhaps various other maps, people giving it another name and or nickname to it, visually marking the presence of this particular island with a buoy as it seems to pose a significant isolated danger to passing vessels in nearby busy marine traffic areas, an important marine ecosystem existing on and or around


Tegucigalpa

; ref During this period, both cities had a population of about 40,000 people. thumb right Basilica of the Virgin of Suyapa, built in 1954 (File:Basilica Virgen de Suyapa.jpg) thumb The Metropolitan Cathedral, built between 1765 and 1786 (File:23 Teguc Hauptpl.JPG) Between the 1930s and 1960s, Tegucigalpa continued to grow reaching a population of over 250,000 people, giving way to what would become one of the biggest neighborhoods in the city, the ''Colonia Kennedy''; the nation's autonomous university, the UNAH; and the construction of the ''Honduras Maya Hotel''. WikiPedia:Tegucigalpa Dmoz:Regional Central_America Honduras Localities Tegucigalpa Commons:Category:Tegucigalpa


Shenyang

Bellevue". * Drink *


Acapulco

, left the Oaxaca coast and founded the village of Villafuerte where the city of Acapulco now stands. Villafuerte was unable to subdue the local native peoples, and this eventually resulted in the Yopa Rebellion in the region of Cuautepec. Hernán Cortés was obligated to send Vasco Porcayo to negotiate with the indigenous people giving concessions. The province of Acapulco became the encomendero of Rodriguez de Villafuerte who received taxes in the form of cocoa, cotton and corn. thumb Codex Tudela (File:Yope Acapulco.png): "Acapulco's Yope Indian, at the South Sea" thumb left upright alt Painting of a sandy beach, sun setting behind it, seen from the water. People sit by a hut with two longboats. A woman carries a basket on her head up the beach toward a tile-roof house. Lush forest is silhouetted against the late sunset. ''View of Acapulco'', 1879, oil painting by Carl Saltzmann (File:Carl Saltzmann - View of Acapulco, 1879.jpg) Cortés established Acapulco as a major port by the early 1530s, with the first major road between Mexico City and the port constructed by 1531. The wharf, named Marqués, was constructed by 1533 between Bruja Point and Diamond Point. Soon after, the area was made an "alcadia" (major province or town). Spanish trade in the Far East would give Acapulco a prominent position in the economy of New Spain. Galleons started arriving here from Asia by 1550, and in that year thirty Spanish families were sent to live here from Mexico City to have a permanent base of European residents. Acapulco would become the second most important port, after Veracruz (Veracruz, Veracruz), due to its direct trade with the Philippines. This trade would focus on the yearly Manila-Acapulco Galleon trade, which was the nexus of all kinds of communications between New Spain, Europe and Asia. In 1573, the port was granted the monopoly of the Manila trade. The galleon trade (Manila-Acapulco Galleon) would make its yearly run from the mid-16th century until the early 19th. The luxury items it brought to New Spain attracted the attention of English and Dutch pirates, such as Francis Drake, Henry Morgan and Thomas Cavendish, who called it "The Black Ship." To protect the port and the cargo of arriving ships, the San Diego Fort was built. Despite the fort's existence, a Dutch fleet invaded Acapulco in 1615, destroying much of the town and fort before being driven off. The fort was destroyed by an earthquake in 1776 and was rebuilt in 1783. At the beginning of the 19th century, King Charles IV declared Acapulco a Ciudad Official and it became an essential part of the Spanish Crown. However, not long after, the Mexican War of Independence began. In 1810, José María Morelos y Pavón attacked and burnt down the city, after he defeated royalist commander Francisco Parés at the Battle of Tres Palos. The independence of Mexico in 1821 ended the run of the Manila Galleon. Acapulco's importance as a port recovered during the California Gold Rush in the mid-19th century, with ships going to and coming from Panama stopping here. In 1911, revolutionary forces (Mexican Revolution) took over the main plaza of Acapulco. In 1920, the Prince of Wales (the future King Edward VIII (Edward VIII of the United Kingdom)) visited the area. Impressed by what he saw, he recommended the place to his compatriots in Europe, making it popular with the elite there. Much of the original hotel and trading infrastructure was built by an East Texas businessman named Albert B. Pullen from Corrigan, Texas, in the area now known as Old Acapulco. But some of Acapulco's best known hotels were built by others. In 1933 Carlos Barnard started the first section of Hotel El Mirador, Portal de Acapulco – Acapulco y su Arquitectura with 12 rooms on the cliffs of La Quebrada (La Quebrada, Mexico). Wolf Schoenborn purchased large amounts of undeveloped land and Albert Pullen built the Las Americas Hotel. In the mid-1940s, the first commercial wharf and warehouses were built. In the early 1950s, President Miguel Alemán Valdés upgraded the port's infrastructure, installing electrical lines, drainage systems, roads and the first highway to connect the port with Mexico City. thumb The Bay of Acapulco from the top of Palma Sola (File:Acapulco - Palmasola-Punto-mas-alto.JPG) The economy grew and foreign investment increased with it. During the 1950s, Acapulco became the fashionable place for millionaire Hollywood stars such as Elizabeth Taylor, Frank Sinatra, Eddie Fisher (Eddie Fisher (singer)) and Brigitte Bardot. Former Swing Musician Teddy Stauffer, so called "Mister Acapulco", was a hotel manager ("Villa Vera", "Casablanca"), who attracted a lot of celebrities to Acapulco. Teddy Stauffer: Der Swingkönig im Paradies – STOCKPRESS.de | STOCKPRESS.de thumb left alt Three 21-story blue-and-white-clad triplet condominiums loom over a white 9-story, next to an older brown-tone 20-story High rise apartments and condominiums were constructed en masse throughout the 1980s–1990s (File:Acapulco-Hot-Icacos - Condominios La Joya.JPG) thumb alt High view of the beachfront condos and hotels on the left, the long curved beach, Pacific ocean on the right Beach at Acapulco (File:Acapulco Beach.jpg) From a population of only 4,000 or 5,000 in the 1940s, by the early 1960s, Acapulco had a population of about 50,000. ''World Book Encyclopedia'', 1967 Edition, Vol. 1, p. 19 In 1958, The Diocese of Acapulco was created by Pope Pius XII. It would become an archdiocese in 1983. WikiPedia:Acapulco Dmoz:Regional North America Mexico States Guerrero Localities Acapulco Commons:Category:Acapulco


Canada

photogenically and geographically records and make measurements of such islands as these using tax-payer money, the man hours it took to record these into government datatbases, such islands as these with their designated names appearing on nautical maps and perhaps various other maps, people giving it another name and or nickname to it, visually marking the presence of this particular island with a buoy as it seems to pose a significant isolated danger to passing vessels in nearby busy marine traffic


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Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017