Places Known For

mastery quot


Oslo

Avis'', the critic Erik Bøgh admired Ibsen's originality and technical mastery: "Not a single declamatory phrase, no high dramatics, no drop of blood, not even a tear." Quoted by Meyer (1967, 477). Every performance of its run was sold out. Meyer (1967, 480). Another production opened at the Royal Theatre (Royal Dramatic Theatre) in Stockholm, Sweden, on 8 January 1880, while productions in Christiania (Oslo) (with Johanne Juell as Nora and Arnoldus Reimers as Torvald) and Bergen followed shortly after. Meyer (1967, 479). Olympic Games Although bandy was the demonstration sport at the VI Olympic Winter Games in 1952 (Oslo, Norway), and is IOC accepted, WikiPedia:Oslo Dmoz:Regional Europe Norway Oslo Commons:Category:Oslo


Florence

the Elder (a noted Sienese jurist) for the church of San Domenico is now shown at the Uffizi in Florence. For the ''Loggia della Mercanzia'', Vecchietta sculpted life-size figures of St. Peter and St. Paul (c.1458-1460), which Vasari praised as "wrought with consummate grace and executed with fine mastery." Vasari, "Vite" Vecchietta also crafted a silver statue of St. Catherine of Siena


West Germany

to those questions which constitute what one calls artistic mastery." Partition of Germany Following Germany's defeat in World War II, the territory east of the Oder-Neisse Line was under Soviet or Polish administration and had ''de facto'' been annexed. The rest of the territory was divided into four occupation zones (Allied-occupied Germany) controlled by the Allies (Allies of World War II), with the former capital, Berlin, being similarly divided into four sectors. The western zones controlled by France, the United Kingdom, and the United States were merged, in May 1949, to form the ''Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany)'' (''Bundesrepublik Deutschland''); in October 1949, the Soviet Zone became the ''German Democratic Republic (East Germany)'' (''Deutsche Demokratische Republik'', or DDR). They were informally known as "West Germany" and "East Germany". However, prior to 1954, the Allies still officially retained responsibility for the whole of Germany and neither East Germany nor West Germany had regained their sovereignty. thumb Willy Brandt (File:Bundesarchiv B 145 Bild-F031406-0017, Erfurt, Treffen Willy Brandt mit Willi Stoph.jpg) (left) and Willi Stoph in Erfurt 1970, the first encounter of a Federal Chancellor with his East German counterpart '''Neue Ostpolitik''' (German (German language) for "new eastern policy"), or '''Ostpolitik''' for short, refers to the normalization of relations between the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) (FRG, or West Germany) and Eastern Europe, particularly the German Democratic Republic (East Germany) (GDR, or East Germany) beginning in 1969. Influenced by Egon Bahr, who proposed "change through rapprochement" in a 1963 speech, the policies were implemented beginning with Willy Brandt, fourth Chancellor of the FRG (Chancellor of Germany) from 1969 to 1974. Intention After World War II, Germany was divided (Allied-occupied Germany) between the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) (FRG, or West Germany) and the German Democratic Republic (East Germany) (GDR, or East Germany). Initially, both governments claimed that they represented the entire German nation. However, the Federal Republic said that it was the only German government with democratic legitimacy. Later, at the end of the 1960s, the communist government of the GDR claimed that there was no longer a common German nation as the GDR had established a "socialist" nation. Thus, a total of 12.3 million ''Heimatvertriebene'' comprised 18% of the population in the two German states created from the Allied occupation zones (Allied occupation zones in Germany) (Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) and German Democratic Republic (East Germany)) in 1950, while another 500,000 expellees found refuge in Austria and other countries. Because of their influx, the population of the post-war German territory had risen by 9.3 million (16%) from 1939 to 1950 despite wartime population losses. The German word ''Grundgesetz'' may be translated as either ''Basic Law'' or '''''Fundamental Law''''' (''Grund'' is cognate with the English (English language) word ''ground''). The term ''Verfassung'' (constitution) was not used, as the drafters regarded the ''Grundgesetz'' as a provisional constitution for the provisional West German state (West Germany) and would not prejudice the decisions of a future reunified Germany (German reunification) to adopt a constitution. Shortly after its adoption, the East German Soviet occupation zone was transformed into the communist (Communism) German Democratic Republic (GDR) with its own constitution. Chronik 30 Jahre – History of Post SV Berlin Rugby, accessed: 11 April 2010 - ''Flight of the Eagle'' ''Ingenjör Andées luftfärd (:sv:Ingenjör Andrées luftfärd (film))'' 1982 Jan Troell Sweden, West Germany, Norway ''Ingenjör Andées luftfärd'' Per Olof Sundman 1967 Novel - First documented in the 13th century, Berlin became the capital of the Kingdom of Prussia (w:Kingdom of Prussia) (1701–1918), the German Empire (w:German Empire) (1871–1918), the Weimar Republic (w:Weimar Republic) (1919–33) and the Third Reich (w:Third Reich) (1933–45). Berlin in the 1920s (w:1920s Berlin) was the third largest municipality in the world. After World War II, the city, along with the German state, was divided - into East Berlin (w:East Berlin) — capital of the German Democratic Republic (w:German Democratic Republic), colloquially identified in English as East Germany — and West Berlin (w:West Berlin), a political exclave (w:exclave) (surrounded by the Berlin Wall (w:Berlin Wall) from 1961 to 1989) and a ''de facto'' (although not ''de jure'' (w:Allied Control Council)) state of the Federal Republic of Germany (w:Federal Republic of Germany), known colloquially in English as West Germany (w:West Germany) from 1949 to 1990. Following German reunification (w:German reunification) in 1990, the city was once more designated as the capital of all Germany. NATO (w:NATO) has been present in Germany since the end of World War II and its presence played an important role in the Cold War, when Germany was split into West Germany (w:West Germany) and East Germany (w:East Germany). The 27,000-pages of documents released on Tuesday reveal that while the United States (w:United States) and West Germany (w:West Germany) knew the location of Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann (w:Adolf Eichmann) two years before his capture, the fact was kept secret. The documents were declassified as part of the Nazi War Criminals Disclosure Act (w:Nazi War Crimes and Japanese Imperial Government Records Interagency Working Group) of 1998.


Stockholm

. Production history ''A Doll's House'' received its world première on 21 December 1879 at the Royal Theatre (Royal Danish Theatre) in Copenhagen, Denmark, with Betty Hennings as Nora and Emil Poulsen as Torvald. Meyer (1967, 477) and Moi (2006, 227, 230). Writing for the Norwegen newspaper ''Folkets Avis'', the critic Erik Bøgh admired Ibsen's originality and technical mastery: "Not a single declamatory phrase, no high dramatics, no drop of blood, not even a tear." Quoted by Meyer (1967, 477). Every performance of its run was sold out. Meyer (1967, 480). Another production opened at the Royal Theatre (Royal Dramatic Theatre) in Stockholm, Sweden, on 8 January 1880, while productions in Christiania (Oslo) (with Johanne Juell as Nora and Arnoldus Reimers as Torvald) and Bergen followed shortly after. Meyer (1967, 479). The Northern Baltic Sea (Northern Baltic) lies between the Stockholm area, southwestern Finland and Estonia. The Western and Eastern Gotland Basins (Gotland Basin) form the major parts of the Central Baltic Sea or Baltic proper. The Bornholm Basin is the area east of Bornholm, and the shallower Arkona Basin extends from Bornholm to the Danish isles of Falster and Zealand (Zealand (Denmark)). Winter storms begin arriving in the region during October. These have caused numerous shipwrecks, and contributed to the extreme difficulties of rescuing passengers of the ferry ''M S Estonia'' en route from Tallinn, Estonia, to Stockholm, Sweden, in September 1994, which claimed the lives of 852 people. Older, wood-based shipwrecks such as the ''Vasa (Vasa (ship))'' tend to remain well-preserved, as the Baltic's cold and brackish water does not suit the shipworm. After hearing the recorded material, president Clive Calder ordered a full album. She flew to Cheiron Studios in Stockholm, Sweden, where half of the album was recorded from March to April 1998, with producers Max Martin, Denniz Pop and Rami Yacoub, among others. Commons:Category:Stockholm Wikipedia:Stockholm Dmoz:Europe Sweden Stockholm County Localities Stockholm


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