Places Known For

historic filipinotown


Historic Filipinotown, Los Angeles

Historic Filipinotown Western Gateway at the corner of Temple St. and Silverlake Blvd. pushpin_map United States Los Angeles Central pushpin_label_position right pushpin_map_caption Location within Central Los Angeles pushpin_mapsize 250 latd 34.0719 longd -118.272959 established_title Named established_date 2002 postal_code_type Zip code postal_code 90026 blank_name_sec1 Streets blank_info_sec1 Alvarado Street, Beverly

Boulevard , Glendale Boulevard, Temple Street (Temple Street (Los Angeles)) thumbnail none Filipino Christian Church is a City of Los Angeles Historical Landmark (File:Filipino Christian Church.jpg) '''Historic Filipinotown''' is a district of the city of Los Angeles, California (Los Angeles), that makes up the southwest portion of Echo Park (Echo Park, Los Angeles). It was created by a resolution proposed by then-City Councilmember Eric Garcetti on August 2, 2002. The district is bounded by the Hoover Street on the west to Glendale Boulevard on the east, Temple Street (Temple Street (Los Angeles)) on the north, Beverly Boulevard on the south side. This section of Echo Park has always been a puzzle, especially since it was separated from its northern portion by the US 101 Freeway (U.S. Route 101) in the 1950s and the southern section of the park where the tennis courts and baseball field are located. Historical Background The district is the first official geographic designation by any city outside the Philippines honoring Filipinos. From a political and community planning standpoint, Historic Filipinotown is in the city of Los Angeles’s Thirteenth District, represented by council member Mitch O'Farrell. It overlaps, and is even divided by, the two larger communities of Silver Lake (Silver Lake, Los Angeles) and Echo Park (Echo Park, Los Angeles, California). Khouri, Andrew (December 3, 2014) "Northern edge of Westlake finally getting developers' attention" ''Los Angeles Times'' Historic Filipinotown was created to help continue the history of this part of the neighborhood and promote economic, civic, commercial, cultural, industrial, and educational interests and common wealth of local residents, business owners, and other stakeholders. Community plans drawn up for Historic Filipinotown also impact the community plans of Silver Lake-Echo Park and a small section of Westlake south of Beverly Boulevard. As a result, Historic Filipinotown must compete with these other localities for services and benefits while avoiding any conflict with their larger community parents. Filipino Americans represent the largest population of Asian Americans in California and also have one of the oldest communities of Asian Americans in the United States. The earliest settlement can be found in enclaves such as Manila Village in Jefferson Parish and St. Malo (St. Malo, Louisiana) in St. Bernard Parish which were founded in 1763 and became home to approximately 2,000 Filipino sailors and laborers. With houses plat-formed on stilts, the fishermen caught and dried their precious commodity, shrimp, for export to Asia, Canada, South and Central America. They introduced innovations such as "dancing the shrimp" and shrimp farming to the United States. Weather conditions eventually destroyed St. Malo in 1915 and Manila Village in 1965. On July 24, 1870, the Spanish-speaking residents of St. Malo founded the first Filipino social club called Sociedad de Beneficencia de los Hispano Filipinos to provide relief and support for the group’s members, including the purchasing of a burial places for their deceased. thumbnail left St. Malo, Louisiana St. Malo (File:5ViewsOfStMaloLouisiana1883.jpg) and Manila Village is the historic precursor to the City of Los Angeles' Historic Filipinotown. Despite the fact that there are other enclaves of Filipinos living outside this district (such as Carson (Carson, California), Cerritos (Cerritos, California), West Covina (West Covina, California), Panorama City (Panorama City, California), and Eagle Rock (Eagle Rock, Los Angeles)) it was named "Historic Filipinotown" since it was one of the few areas where Filipinos first settled during the early part of the 20th century and home to key Filipino organizations, Filipino churches (Filipino Christian Church, Iglesia ni Kristo, St. Columban Filipino Catholic Church, United Church of God Ministries, Praise Christian Fellowship, and Congregational Christian Church), housing (Manila Terrace, Mindanao Towers, Mountain View Terrace, and Villa Ramos), and social service centers. Many Filipino American families began purchasing homes and establishing businesses in the area beginning from the 1940s, shifting away from the downtown area now known as Little Tokyo (Little Tokyo, Los Angeles, California) in the 1920s and the Bunker Hill (Bunker Hill, Los Angeles) area later. In a section of downtown Los Angeles now known as Little Tokyo (Little Tokyo, Los Angeles), a thriving community known as Little Manila existed and flourished for over two decades (1920s-1940s). This community of mostly males established numerous restaurants, pool halls, café's, employment agencies and barbershops which became the hub where Filipinos congregated, lived, socialized, organized, and networked among their compatriots to find companionship, fellowship and work. One would merely drive to First and Main Streets to solicit Filipinos; either by Hollywood studios in need of ethnic-type extras for cinematic productions or many others in need of cheap labor. Ethnic enclaves like Chinatown (Chinatown, Los Angeles), Historic Filipinotown (Historic Filipinotown, Los Angeles), Koreatown (Koreatown, Los Angeles), Little Armenia (Little Armenia, Los Angeles), Little Ethiopia (Little Ethiopia, Los Angeles), Tehrangeles, Little Tokyo (Little Tokyo, Los Angeles), and Thai Town (Thai Town, Los Angeles) provide examples of the polyglot (Multilingualism) character of Los Angeles.


Echo Park, Los Angeles

http: www.latimes.com news local la-me-outthere27-2008jun27-g,0,4470291.graphic#axzz2kukV5CNP title Echo Park work Mapping L.A. publisher ''Los Angeles Times'' Thomas Guide, Los Angeles County, 2004, pages 594 and 634 Within Echo Park lie the neighborhoods of Angelino Heights, Elysian Heights (Elysian Heights, Los Angeles), Historic Filipinotown (Historic Filipinotown, Los Angeles), and Victor Heights. ref name


Koreatown, Los Angeles

is home to people from more than 140 countries speaking 224 different identified languages. Ethnic enclaves like Chinatown (Chinatown, Los Angeles), Historic Filipinotown (Historic Filipinotown, Los Angeles), Koreatown (Koreatown, Los Angeles), Little Armenia (Little Armenia, Los Angeles), Little


Chinatown, Los Angeles

results_cibasic.htm title City basics publisher Lacity.org date April 12, 2005 accessdate April 13, 2010 Ethnic enclaves like Chinatown (Chinatown, Los Angeles), Historic Filipinotown (Historic Filipinotown, Los Angeles), Koreatown (Koreatown, Los Angeles), Little Armenia (Little Armenia, Los Angeles), Little Ethiopia (Little Ethiopia, Los Angeles), Tehrangeles, Little Tokyo (Little Tokyo, Los Angeles), and Thai Town (Thai Town, Los Angeles) provide examples


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