Places Known For

free political


Kyrgyzstan

divisions of China province-level entity known as "Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region". **Update: The Article size (Wikipedia:Article size) is now 46 kb. * Tulip Revolution: As protestors storm government buildings in Kyrgyzstan and free political prisonsers, and the Kyrgyz Supreme Court declares the results of its parliamentary elections (Kyrgyz parliamentary elections, 2005) invalid, President '''Askar Akayev''' resigns and flees the country with his family by helicopter. He is believed to have gone either to Kazakhstan or Russia. --Kitch (User:Kitch) 16:12, 24 Mar 2005 (UTC) **Yes, that ought to be put up quick. I suggest a picture of Askayev if we can't get a good image of the protesters, or failing both of these we'll have to make do with the flag. Why is Prince Rainier considered a more important story than the toppling of the government in Kyrgyzstan? Someone had better change this quickly before our credibility as a group of people capable of organising knowledge and making sense of world events lies in tatters. "Tonight's top story: Old man is ill! By the way, there's also been a revolution in Kyrgyzstan." — Trilobite (User:Trilobite) (Talk) (User_talk:Trilobite) 19:41, 24 Mar 2005 (UTC) ** Isn't this limited to the US? Haven't heard about it in Danish media but there is an article on the BBC webpage. The article here is in a horrible state but I don't know if that would be a reason not to put it on the frontpage? Preisler (User:Preisler) 21:33, 19 Mar 2005 (UTC) *** Are we now excluding events simply because they take place in the US? This is a story of major importance in the US; it has been on the front page of the New York Times for the last four days in a row. Euthanasia is a topic of importance and controversy in the US and in countries around the world. We're currently featuring stories about government turmoil in Namibia and Kyrgyzstan, but we won't cover a major ongoing story taking place in the US? Seems like a double standard to me. - Jpo (User:Jpo) 23:22, Mar 22, 2005 (UTC) **** I agree in principle, though I don't care one way or the other about this particular item. Keep in mind that we don't have Namibian current events or Kyrgyzstanian current events to exile stories to like they are for American current events. —Korath (User:Korath) (Talk (User talk:Korath)) 23:41, Mar 22, 2005 (UTC) '''Transit Center at Manas''' (formerly '''Manas Air Base''' and unofficially '''Ganci Air Base''') is a United States military installation at Manas International Airport, near Bishkek, the capital of Kyrgyzstan, primarily operated by the U.S. Air Force (United States Air Force). Central Asia Central Asia is deemed to consist of the five former Soviet Socialist Republics: Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikstan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan. However, Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan are sometimes included. The predominant religion in Central Asia is Islam. Central Asia has a long rich history mainly based on its historic position on the famous Silk Road. It has been conquered by Mongols, Persians (Persian people), Tatars, Russians, Sarmatian and thus has a very distinct, vibrant culture. The culture is influenced by Chinese (Chinese people), South Asian, Persian (Persian people), Arabian, Turkish (Turkish people), Russian (Russian people), Sarmatian and Mongolian cultures. The people of the steppes of Central Asia have historically been nomadic people but a unifying state was established in Central Asia in the 16th century: The Kazakh Khanate. He is a substitute for the Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection, a member of the Delegation for relations with the Palestinian Legislative Council and a substitute for the Delegation to the EU-Kazakhstan, EU-Kyrgyzstan and EU-Uzbekistan Parliamentary Cooperation Committees, and for relations with Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Mongolia. Education * Kazakhstan, 30 August * Kyrgyzstan, May 5 (1993). See Constitution of Kyrgyzstan. * Lithuania, October 25 (1992). See Constitution of Lithuania. He is also a former member of the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (European Parliament Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs), a former substitute for the Committee on Transport and Tourism (European Parliament Committee on Transport and Tourism), a former member of the delegation to the EU (European Union)–Armenia, EU–Azerbaijan and EU–Georgia (Georgia (country)) Parliamentary Cooperation Committees, a former member of the delegation to the EU–Kazakhstan, EU–Kyrgyzstan and EU–Uzbekistan Parliamentary Cooperation Committees, and for relations with Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Mongolia, and a former substitute for the delegation for relations with the People's Republic of China. European Parliament (2004-2006) In 2004 (European Parliament Election, 2004) he was elected to the European Parliament representing the North-West (European Parliament Election, 2004 (Italy)#Seats) region for the Democrats of the Left, part of the Socialist Group (Party of European Socialists), and sat on the European Parliament's Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs. He was a substitute for the Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection, a member of the Delegation to the European Union-Kazakhstan, EU-Kyrgyzstan and EU-Uzbekistan Parliamentary Cooperation Committees, and for relations with Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Mongolia, and a substitute for the Delegation for relations with Belarus. He left the European Parliament on his re-election to the Chamber of Deputies in 2006, and he was appointed as Minister of Economic Development in the government of Prime Minister Romano Prodi on May 17, 2006. She is a substitute for the Committee on Women's Rights and Gender Equality and the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety. She is also a member of the Delegation to the EU-Kazakhstan, EU-Kyrgyzstan and EU-Uzbekistan Parliamentary Cooperation Committees, and for relations with Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Mongolia. Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection, a member of the Delegation to the EU-Kazakhstan, EU-Kyrgyzstan and EU-Uzbekistan Parliamentary Cooperation Committees, and for relations with Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Mongolia and a substitute for the Delegation to the EU-Romania Joint Parliamentary Committee. He is a substitute for the Committee on Budgets and a member of the Delegation to the EU-Kazakhstan, EU-Kyrgyzstan and EU-Uzbekistan Parliamentary Cooperation Committees, and for relations with Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Mongolia. Wojciechowski was a Member of the Bureau of the European People's Party (EPP) from 2004-2006 and is vice-chair of the European Parliament's Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development. Wojciechowski was dismissed from his PSL party following his decision to leave the EPP for the Union for Europe of the Nations EU parliamentary grouping. Wojciechowski is a substitute for the Committee on Budgetary Control and a member of the Delegation to the EU-Kazakhstan, EU-Kyrgyzstan and EU-Uzbekistan Parliamentary Cooperation Committees, and for relations with Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Mongolia. Jo‘rayev's lyrics are often quoted and his music enjoyed by numerous fans. He is often invited to other countries, such as Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Russia. While Jo'rayev usually writes both the music and lyrics to his songs, he also uses the works of classical poets such as Ali-Shir Nava'i, Rumi, Babur, and Jami in his songs. In 2008, Jo'rayev organized gateherings at his home to celebrate the works of Rumi. Commons:Category:Kyrgyzstan WikiPedia:Kyrgyzstan Dmoz:Regional Asia Kyrgyzstan


Kingdom of Hungary

machine by amending the electoral law, providing jobs in the expanding bureaucracy to his supporters, and manipulating elections in rural areas. Bethlen restored order to the country by giving the radical counterrevolutionaries payoffs and government jobs in exchange for ceasing their campaign of terror against Jews and leftists. In 1921, he made a deal with the Social Democrats and trade unions (called Bethlen-Peyer Pact), agreeing, among other things, to legalize their activities and free

political prisoners in return for their pledge to refrain from spreading anti-Hungarian (Magyarization) propaganda, calling political strikes, and organizing the peasantry. Bethlen brought Hungary into the League of Nations in 1922 and out of international isolation by signing a treaty of friendship with Italy in 1927. The revision of the Treaty of Trianon rose to the top of Hungary's political agenda and the strategy employed by Bethlen consisted by strengthening the economy and building relations with stronger nations. Revision of the treaty had such a broad backing in Hungary that Bethlen used it, at least in part, to deflect criticism of his economic, social, and political policies. thumb upright left István Bethlen (File:Bundesarchiv Bild 102-10737, Graf István Bethlen.jpg), the Prime Minister of Hungary The Great Depression induced a drop in the standard of living and the political mood of the country shifted further toward the right. In 1932 Horthy appointed a new prime-minister, Gyula Gömbös, who changed the course of Hungarian policy towards closer cooperation with Germany. Gömbös signed a trade agreement with Germany that drew Hungary's economy out of depression but made Hungary dependent on the German economy for both raw materials and markets. On 2 November 1938, the First Vienna Award transferred parts of Southern Slovakia (Upper Hungary) and Carpathian Ruthenia to Hungary, an area amounting to 11,927 km² and a population of 869,299 (86.5% of which were Hungarians according to the 1941 census). Between 5 November and 10 November, Hungarian armed forces peacefully occupied the newly transferred territories. Thomas, ''The Royal Hungarian Army in World War II'', pg. 11 Hitler later promised to transfer all of Slovakia to Hungary in exchange for a military alliance, but his offer was rejected. Instead, Horthy chose to pursue a territorial revision to be decided along ethnic lines. In March 1939, the Czecho-Slovak Republic was dissolved, Germany invaded it (German occupation of Czechoslovakia), and the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia was established. On 14 March, Slovakia (Slovak Republic (1939–1945)) declared itself to be an independent state. On 15 March, Carpatho-Ukraine declared itself to be an independent state. Hungary rejected the independence of Carpatho-Ukraine and, between 14 March and 18 March, Hungarian armed forces occupied the rest of Carpathian Ruthenia and ousted the government of Avgustyn Voloshyn. By contrast, Hungary recognized the Nazi puppet state of Slovakia led by the Clerical Fascist (Clerical fascism) Jozef Tiso. Slovakia – US State Department In September 1940, with troops massing on both sides of the Hungarian-Romanian border, war was averted by the Second Vienna Award. This award transferred the northern half of Transylvania to Hungary, with a total area of 43,492 km² and a total population of 2,578,100 with a 53.5% Hungarian majority according to the 1941 census. By dividing Transylvania between Romania and Hungary, Hitler was able to ease tensions in Hungary. In October 1940, the Germans initiated a reciprocity policy between Romania and Hungary which was continued until the end of World War II. The region of Sub-Carpathia (Carpathian Ruthenia) was given special autonomous status with the intention that (eventually) it would be self-governed by the Ruthenian minority. thumb right The Kingdom of Hungary in 1942, during World War II. (File:Kingdom of Hungary (1942).svg) During World War II 1941–1945 the Kingdom of Serbia and its dynasty became the backbone of the new multinational state, the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (later renamed Yugoslavia). Czechoslovakia, combining the Kingdom of Bohemia with parts of the Kingdom of Hungary, became a new nation. Russia became the Soviet Union and lost Finland, Estonia, Lithuania, and Latvia, which became independent countries. The Ottoman Empire was soon replaced by Turkey and several other countries in the Middle East. thumb right Map of territorial changes in Europe after World War I (File:Map Europe 1923-en.svg) From then onwards, it was a centre of mining and metallurgy until the end of the 20th century, particularly focussed on the iron and copper industries. At the start of the 20th century, the Krompachy Ironworks (Krompašská železiareň) had around 3,500 employees and was the biggest ironworks of its time in the Kingdom of Hungary. The Ironworks closed after World War I. '''János Bottyán''' (1643, Esztergom, Hungary – September 27, 1709), also known as '''Blind Bottyán''', '''Vak Bottyán János''' was a Hungarian (Kingdom of Hungary) kuruc general. Such super-sized bombards had been employed in Western Europe siege warfare since the beginning of the 15th century, Schmidtchen (1977a), pp. 153–157 and were introduced to the Ottoman army in 1453 by the gunfounder Orban (from Brasov, Kingdom of Hungary) on the occasion of the Siege of Constantinople (Fall of Constantinople). Schmidtchen (1977b), p. 226 Ali's piece is assumed to have followed closely the outline of these guns. Bruck was born in Temesvár, Kingdom of Hungary, Austro-Hungarian Empire, since 1920 Timişoara, since 1920 in Romania.


Kazakhstan

; ref Such local brands continue to contribute to the company's international revenue stream. **Update: The Article size (Wikipedia:Article size) is now 46 kb. * Tulip Revolution: As protestors storm government buildings in Kyrgyzstan and free political prisonsers, and the Kyrgyz Supreme Court declares the results of its parliamentary elections (Kyrgyz parliamentary elections, 2005) invalid, President '''Askar Akayev''' resigns and flees the country with his family by helicopter. He is believed to have gone either to Kazakhstan or Russia. --Kitch (User:Kitch) 16:12, 24 Mar 2005 (UTC) **Yes, that ought to be put up quick. I suggest a picture of Askayev if we can't get a good image of the protesters, or failing both of these we'll have to make do with the flag. Why is Prince Rainier considered a more important story than the toppling of the government in Kyrgyzstan? Someone had better change this quickly before our credibility as a group of people capable of organising knowledge and making sense of world events lies in tatters. "Tonight's top story: Old man is ill! By the way, there's also been a revolution in Kyrgyzstan." — Trilobite (User:Trilobite) (Talk) (User_talk:Trilobite) 19:41, 24 Mar 2005 (UTC) 2011 Ivanovic started the year with the 2011 Hopman Cup in Perth (Perth, Western Australia), Australia. She competed along with Novak Djokovic under the Serbian flag. Ana and Djokovic swept their first two ties against Kazakhstan and Australia, 3–0, but fell against Belgium, 1–2. They did qualify for the final, but due to an injury sustained during Ivanovic's match against Justine Henin, Serbia was forced to withdraw. Along with the Hopman Cup, Ivanovic also withdrew from Sydney. thumb right 250px Ivanovic celebrating Novak Djokovic Djokovic's (File:Ana Ivanovic 2011.jpg) win at the 2011 Australian Open Central Asia Central Asia is deemed to consist of the five former Soviet Socialist Republics: Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikstan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan. However, Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan are sometimes included. The predominant religion in Central Asia is Islam. Central Asia has a long rich history mainly based on its historic position on the famous Silk Road. It has been conquered by Mongols, Persians (Persian people), Tatars, Russians, Sarmatian and thus has a very distinct, vibrant culture. The culture is influenced by Chinese (Chinese people), South Asian, Persian (Persian people), Arabian, Turkish (Turkish people), Russian (Russian people), Sarmatian and Mongolian cultures. The people of the steppes of Central Asia have historically been nomadic people but a unifying state was established in Central Asia in the 16th century: The Kazakh Khanate. The consensus among scholars had long been and still is that the Khazars spoke an Oghuric Turkic language similar to Chuvash (Chuvash language), Hunnish (Hunnic language), Commons:Category:Kazakhstan WikiPedia:Kazakhstan Dmoz:Regional Asia Kazakhstan


Russia

is now 46 kb. * Tulip Revolution: As protestors storm government buildings in Kyrgyzstan and free political prisonsers, and the Kyrgyz Supreme Court declares the results of its parliamentary elections (Kyrgyz parliamentary elections, 2005) invalid, President '''Askar Akayev''' resigns and flees the country with his family by helicopter. He is believed to have gone either to Kazakhstan or Russia. --Kitch (User:Kitch) 16:12, 24 Mar 2005 (UTC) **Yes, that ought to be put up quick. I suggest a picture of Askayev if we can't get a good image of the protesters, or failing both of these we'll have to make do with the flag. Why is Prince Rainier considered a more important story than the toppling of the government in Kyrgyzstan? Someone had better change this quickly before our credibility as a group of people capable of organising knowledge and making sense of world events lies in tatters. "Tonight's top story: Old man is ill! By the way, there's also been a revolution in Kyrgyzstan." — Trilobite (User:Trilobite) (Talk) (User_talk:Trilobite) 19:41, 24 Mar 2005 (UTC) After a few years he came to London, and entered the schools of the Royal Academy. His first exhibited picture was a "Gipsy Boy with an Ass" (1803), in the style of John Opie. In 1805 he travelled, by ship, to Russia, but was wrecked at Memel (Klaipėda), where he raised funds for the remaining journey by painting portraits of the Dutch consul and others. He then proceeded overland to St. Petersburg, passing through a great portion of the Russian army on its way to Austerlitz (Battle of Austerlitz). At the Russian capital he found friends, including Sir Alexander Crichton, physician to the imperial family. Having learned Russian, he travelled in the interior of the country, and spent several years in the Ukraine, making excursions to Turkey, Tartary, and elsewhere, studying the culture of Cossacks, Circassians, and Tartars, and collecting arms and armour. In 1809 a picture by him of "Russian Peasants keeping their Holiday" was exhibited at the Royal Academy. His wish to return home in 1812 had to be postponed due to the French invasion of Russia, many of the horrors of which he witnessed first-hand. In the weeks following the October insurrection, military revolutionary committees based on the MRC of Petrograd were set up throughout the other soviets and helped cement Bolshevik control. These other MRCs were formed by locals but agents from the Petrograd MRC were often in positions to give advice or direction. By the end of October 1917, representatives from the Petrograd MRC were on assignments in at least forty-four cities as well as 113 military units throughout Russia, Turkestan, and the Caucasus. Rigby, pp. 42-43 In modern Russia, the transliterated term gastarbeiter (гастарбайтер) is used to denote workers from former Soviet republics coming to Russia (mainly Moscow and Saint Petersburg) in search of work. These workers come primarily from Ukraine, Moldova, Armenia, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. Also for a guest worker from outside Europe, from China, Afghanistan, Vietnam, Angola, Mozambique and Ethiopia. In contrast to such words as "gastrolle" (гастроль, сoncert tour), "gast professor" (invited to read the course at another university), which came to Russian from German, the word "gastarbeiter" - is not neutral in modern Russian and has a negative connotation. :''By your pure and Immaculate Conception, O Mary, obtain the conversion of Russia, Spain, Portugal, Europe and the whole world!'' Laila Hietamies's first novel ''Lehmusten kaupunki'' ('City of the Lindens') was published in 1972 and started a series of novels about Lappeenranta, of which the seventh part was published 2004. Hietamies has written many other novel series, mostly telling about Karelia and the consequences of the wars of Finland in the 1940s. She has written also books about a Russian princess Sonja at the time of the Russian Revolution (Russian Revolution of 1917). The '''''Talwar'' class''' is a new class of frigates designed and built by Russia for the Indian Navy. The Talwar class guided missile frigates, also known as the Type 1135.6, are modified ''Krivak III class (Krivak class frigate) frigates from Russia. The Talwar Class has a displacement of 4,000 tons and speed of 30 knots and is capable of accomplishing a wide variety of missions, primarily, finding and eliminating enemy submarines and large surface ships. History On 17 November 1997, Russia and India signed a $1 billion contract, for three ''Krivak III'' class multi-purpose frigates. The Indian Navy wanted to fill the gap created by the decommissioning of the ''Leander'' class (Leander class frigate) frigates until the Project 17 Class frigates (Shivalik class frigate) entered service. The focal point in Cronberg's work in recent times has been peace and security. After the Cold War she worked both in Russia and in the US studying the conversion of military industries into civilian uses. Together with Stanford University and the Perm Technical University she and her team studied the transformation processes mainly in the aerospace industry. As the Regional Director of North Karelia she was instrumental in establishing "soft borders" between Finnish border regions and the Karelian Republic on the Russian side. Her work led to the establishmnet of Euregio Karelia, a cross-border region with common development programmes and projects. Later, as the director of COPRI, Copenhagen Peace Research Institute she was involved in the further development of the Copenhagen School of Security Studies, doing also work on missile defences and dual-use technologies. In her political work she has specialised in defence and security matters, lately in questions of nuclear disarmament Her choice of committees in the parliament reflects these interests, as does her work as the Chair of the Parliament's delegation for relations with Iran European Parliament delegation for relations with Iran New York City is multicultural. About 36% of the city's population is foreign-born., Commons:Category:Russia WikiPedia:Russia Dmoz:Regional Europe Russia


France

of the Movement for France). Life and career Carlo Rovelli was born in Verona, Italy, in 1956. In the 1970s he participated in the student political movements in Italian universities. He was involved with the free political radio stations Radio Alice in Bologna and Radio Anguana in Verona, which he helped found. In conjunction with his political activity, he was charged, but later released, for crimes of opinion related to the book ''Fatti Nostri,'' which he co-authored with Enrico Palandri


United States

and the Chairman of the Board of Directors in 1991. He has been a Director of Siam Commercial Bank since 1984. Arévalo served as President from 15 March 1945 to 15 March 1951. Arévalo's administration was marked by unprecedented relatively free political life during his six year term. Arévalo, an educator and philosopher, understood the need for advancement

States American political scientist and analyst (political analyst). He is the Robert Kent Gooch Professor of Politics at the University of Virginia, and director of its Center for Politics (University of Virginia Center for Politics). He founded ''Sabato's Crystal Ball'', an online newsletter and website that provides free political analysis and electoral projections. He has been called "the most-quoted college professor in the land" ref name WSJ_Perry_19940718>


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017