Places Known For

ancient national


Federated States of Micronesia

, are the ancient national colours of Portugal and are the colours of the United Nations. * Blue, white and yellow are the national colours of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo and Uruguay. Parties ''193'' Commons:Category:Federated States of Micronesia WikiPedia:Federated States of Micronesia Dmoz:Regional Oceania Micronesia, Federated States of


Kosovo

his former possessions in Greece. Livy XL.57 * Blue and white are the national colours of Scotland, Argentina, El Salvador, Finland, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Israel, Micronesia (Federated States of Micronesia), Nicaragua and Somalia, are the ancient national colours of Portugal and are the colours of the United Nations. * Blue, white and yellow are the national colours of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo and Uruguay. * Blue, white and green are the national colours of Sierra Leone. Montenegro was the first that declared war on 8 October(25 September O.S.).


Somalia

States of Micronesia Micronesia , Nicaragua and Somalia, are the ancient national colours of Portugal and are the colours of the United Nations. * Blue, white and yellow are the national colours of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo and Uruguay. At Commons:Category:Somalia WikiPedia:Somalia Dmoz:Regional Africa Somalia


Nicaragua

and Somalia, are the ancient national colours of Portugal and are the colours of the United Nations. * Blue, white and yellow are the national colours of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo and Uruguay. A large wave of Basques emigrated to Latin America and substantial numbers settled elsewhere in North (the U.S.) and Latin America, particularly in Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Nicaragua, Panama, Uruguay and Venezuela, where Basque place names are to be found, such as New Biscay, now Durango (Mexico), Biscayne Bay, Jalapa (Jalapa, Jalapa) (Guatemala), Aguerreberry or Aguereberry Point in the United States, and the ''Nuevo Santander'' region of Mexico.


Honduras

Commons:Category:Honduras wikipedia:Honduras


Bosnia and Herzegovina

;!-- Bot generated title -- and some of these events are available on the World Championship Sports Network (WCSN). WCSN - The Home of World Champions * Blue and white are the national colours of Scotland, Argentina, El Salvador, Finland, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Israel, Micronesia (Federated States of Micronesia), Nicaragua and Somalia, are the ancient national colours of Portugal and are the colours of the United Nations. * Blue, white and yellow are the national colours of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo and Uruguay. * Blue, white and green are the national colours of Sierra Leone. At the same time, in October 1908, Austria-Hungary seized the opportunity of the Ottoman political upheaval to annex the ''de jure'' Ottoman province of Bosnia-Herzegovina (Bosnia and Herzegovina), which it had occupied since 1878 (see ''Bosnian Crisis''), and Bulgaria declared itself a fully independent kingdom. The Greeks of the autonomous Cretan State proclaimed unification with Greece, though the opposition of the Great Powers prevented the latter action from taking practical effect. The First World War (World War I) was sparked in the Balkans in 1914 when a Black hand revolutionary organization with predominately Serbian and pro Yugoslav oriented members assassinated (assassination in Sarajevo) in Bosnia and Herzegovina's capital Sarajevo the Austro-Hungarian heir Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria. That caused a war between the two countries which—through the existing chains of alliances (Allies of World War I)-- led to the First World War. The Ottoman empire soon joined the Central powers becoming one of the three empires participating in that alliance. The next year Bulgaria joined the Central Powers attacking Serbia which was successfully fighting Austro-Hungary to the north for a year. That led to Serbia's defeat and the intervention of the Entente (Allies of World War I) in the Balkans which sent an expeditionary force to establish a new front (Macedonian front), the third one of that war, which soon also became static. The participation of Greece in the war three years later, in 1918, on the part of the Entente finally altered the balance between the opponents leading to the collapse of the common German-Bulgarian front there which caused the exit of Bulgaria from the war, and in turn the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire ending the First World War. Encyclopedia of World War I, Spencer Tucker, Priscilla Mary Roberts, p.242 thumb The 13th century church of Church of St. John at Kaneo St. John at Kaneo (File:Sveti Jovan Kaneo & Lake Ohrid.jpg) and the Ohrid Lake in Macedonia. The lake and town were declared a World Heritage Site (Table of World Heritage Sites by country) by UNESCO in 1980. Post–Cold War In the 1990s, the region was gravely affected by the wars between the former Yugoslav republics (Yugoslav wars) that broke out after Slovenia and Croatia held free elections and their people voted for independence on their respective countries' referendums. Serbia in turn declared the dissolution of the union as unconstitutional and the Yugoslavian army (Yugoslav People's Army) unsuccessfully tried to maintain status quo. Slovenia and Croatia declared independence on 26 June 1991, followed by the Ten-Day War in Slovenia. Till October 1991, the Army withdrew from Slovenia, and in Croatia, the war (Croatian War of Independence) between the Croatian government and local Serbs would continue until 1995 (Operation Storm). In the ensuing 10 years armed confrontation, gradually all the other Republics declared independence, with Bosnia being the most affected (Bosnian War) by the fighting. The long lasting wars resulted in a United Nations intervention and NATO (NATO intervention in Bosnia) ground and air forces took action against Serb forces (1995 NATO bombing campaign in Bosnia and Herzegovina) in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Serbia (1999 NATO bombing of Yugoslavia) (including its southern province of Kosovo). thumb Austro-Hungarian Empire Austro-Hungarian (File:Hromadná poprava srbského obyvatelstva.jpg) soldiers executing Serb civilians during World War I occupation, Mačva, 1914 thumb Austro-Hungarian Empire Austro-Hungarian (File:Hromadná poprava srbského obyvatelstva.jpg) soldiers executing Serb civilians during World War I occupation, Mačva, 1914 From the dissolution of Yugoslavia six republics achieved international recognition as sovereign republics: Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Macedonia (Republic of Macedonia), Montenegro and Serbia. The Albanian institutions in Kosovo, currently under UN administration, declared independence in 2008 (according to the official Serbian policy, Kosovo is still an internal autonomous region). In July 2010, the International Court of Justice, after a UN General Assembly's request, opined that, since there is not an active rule in international law limiting the declarations of independence, the unilateral Kosovar proclamation does not violate it (leaving unanswered the questions about the consequences of said act, including whether with said declaration Kosovo achieved the status of a State). The international community is still divided on the matter and while the majority of the UN members do not recognize it as independent, most NATO and EU (European Union) countries do. After the end of the wars a revolution (October revolution) broke in Serbia and Slobodan Milošević, the Serbian communist leader (elected president between 1989–2000), was overthrown and handed for trial to the International Criminal Tribunal (International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia) for crimes against the International Humanitarian Law during the Yugoslav wars. Milošević died of a heart attack in 2006 before a verdict could have been released. Ιn 2001 an Albanian uprising (Insurgency in the Republic of Macedonia) in Macedonia (Republic of Macedonia) forced the country to give local autonomy to the ethnic Albanians (Albanians in Macedonia) in the areas where they predominate. Greece has been a member of the European Union since 1981; Slovenia since 2004. Bulgaria and Romania joined in 2007. In 2005, the European Union decided to start accession negotiations with candidate countries; Croatia, Turkey, and Macedonia (Republic of Macedonia) were accepted as candidates for European Union membership. As of April 2009, Ceremony marks the accession of Albania and Croatia to NATO, NATO – News, 7 April 2009. Retrieved 2009-04-18. Albania, Bulgaria, Croatia, Romania and Slovenia are also members of NATO. Bosnia and Herzegovina and what was then Serbia and Montenegro started negotiations with the EU over the Stabilization and Accession Agreements, although shortly after they started, negotiations with Serbia and Montenegro were suspended for lack of co-operation with the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia. In 2008 (2008 Bucharest summit) Greece vetoed Macedonia's NATO membership bid over the Macedonia naming dispute between the two countries


Switzerland

commons:Confoederatio Helvetica


Greece

of Scotland, Argentina, El Salvador, Finland, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Israel, Micronesia (Federated States of Micronesia), Nicaragua and Somalia, are the ancient national colours of Portugal and are the colours of the United Nations. * Blue, white and yellow are the national colours of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo and Uruguay. In the early 19th century the foundations for the extensive collection of sculpture began to be laid and Greek, Roman and Egyptian artefacts dominated the antiquities displays. After the defeat of the French Campaign (French Revolutionary Wars: Campaigns of 1799) in the Battle of the Nile, in 1801, the British Museum acquired more Egyptian sculpture and in 1802 King George III (George III of the United Kingdom) presented the Rosetta Stone – key to the deciphering of hieroglyphs. ''Wondrous Curiosities - Ancient Egypt at the British Museum'', pg 66-72 (Stephanie Moser, 2006, ISBN 0226542092) Gifts and purchases from Henry Salt (Henry Salt (Egyptologist)), British Consul General in Egypt, beginning with the Colossal bust of Ramesses II (Younger Memnon) in 1818, laid the foundations of the collection of Egyptian Monumental Sculpture. ''The Story of the British Museum'', pg 24 (Marjorie Caygill, 2003, ISBN 0714127728) Many Greek sculptures followed, notably the first purpose-built exhibition space, the Charles Towneley collection (Charles Towneley), much of it Roman Sculpture, in 1805. In 1806, Thomas Bruce, 7th Earl of Elgin, ambassador to the Ottoman Empire from 1799 to 1803 removed the large collection of marble sculptures from the Parthenon, on the Acropolis (Acropolis of Athens) in Athens and transferred them to the UK. In 1816 these masterpieces of western art, were acquired by The British Museum by Act of Parliament and deposited in the museum thereafter. The British Museum - The Elgin Marbles, pg 85 (B.F.Cook, 2005, ISBN 0714121347 The collections were supplemented by the Bassae frieze from Phigaleia (Phigalia), Greece in 1815. The Ancient Near Eastern collection also had its beginnings in 1825 with the purchase of Assyrian and Babylonian antiquities from the widow of Claudius James Rich. The British Museum - Assyrian Sculpture, pg 6-7 (Julian Reade, 2004, ISBN 071412141X) It is a point of controversy whether museums should be allowed to possess artefacts taken from other countries, and the British Museum is a notable target for criticism. The Elgin Marbles, Benin Bronzes and the Rosetta Stone are among the most disputed objects in its collections, and organisations have been formed demanding the return of these artefacts to their native countries of Greece, Nigeria and Egypt respectively. Disputed items in the collection *Elgin Marbles - claimed by Greece and backed by UNESCO among others for restitution http: www.parthenonuk.com article.php?id 79 *Benin Bronzes - claimed by Nigeria, 30 pieces sold already by The British Museum privately in the 1960s Commons:Category:Greece Wikipedia:Greece Dmoz:Regional Europe Greece


Argentina

Others attribute the crisis to Argentina’s misdesigned fiscal federalism, which caused subnational spending to increase rapidly. Stephen Webb, “Argentina: Hardening the Provincial Budget Constraint,” in Rodden, Eskeland, and Litvack (eds.), ''Fiscal Decentralization and the Challenge of Hard Budget Constraints'' (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2003). The crisis added to widespread hatred of this institution in Argentina and other South American countries, with many blaming the IMF for the region’s economic problems. How the IMF Props Up the Bankrupt Dollar System, by F. William Engdahl, U.S. Germany The current—as of early 2006—trend toward moderate left-wing governments in the region and a growing concern with the development of a regional economic policy largely independent of big business pressures has been ascribed to this crisis. From 1438 to 1533, the Incas used a variety of methods, from conquest to peaceful assimilation, to incorporate a large portion of western South America, centered on the Andean (Andes) mountain ranges, including, besides Peru, large parts of modern Ecuador, western and south central Bolivia, northwest Argentina, north and central


Portugal

, though not necessarily with this interpretation in mind. * Blue and white are the national colours of Scotland, Argentina, El Salvador, Finland, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Israel, Micronesia (Federated States of Micronesia), Nicaragua and Somalia, are the ancient national colours of Portugal and are the colours of the United Nations. * Blue, white and yellow are the national colours of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo and Uruguay. Portuguese In August 1511 on behalf of the king of Portugal, Afonso de Albuquerque conquered Malacca, which at the time was the hub of Asian trade. In November of that year, after having secured Malacca and learning of the Bandas' location, Albuquerque sent an expedition of three ships led by his good friend António de Abreu to find them. Malay (Malay (ethnic group)) pilots, either recruited or forcibly conscripted, guided them via Java, the Lesser Sundas and Ambon (Ambon Island) to Banda, arriving in early 1512. Hannard (1991), page 7;


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